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Wednesday, 27 April 2005
INTERNACIONAL for Post-Capitalist ParticipatoryDemocracy-Revolucion PCPD-R
Topic: MER Policies - 3rdWorld





POINTS FOR REVOLUTIONARY POLICY FORMATION (Decision-Time)

1. National and global social movements need to embrace a practical and focused goal of accumulating power in order to takeover governments. Conventional politics and left-thinking in the USA are dead.

2. The only effective means of altering the balance of power in the US (and thus the world) are armed struggle; relocating activists and supporters of change to states in the USA where they can seize power; or through massive financial aid to the revolutions in the Andes. Protests, lobbying and voting are stupid. They actually aid the power elite who want the appearance of democracy and opposition – as long as it can accomplish nothing. (6)

3. The leaders of USA environmental and justice groups are barriers to change. The debate is whether to try new strategies or fall back on style and simply modify the current moderate plan of merging left issues together in a coalition with moderate democrats – a strategy where victory becomes as meaningless as defeat!

4. The USA is an empire of corporate, trade and, military alliances. Only through extending our conceptions of politics – which is another word for Power – extending it beyond the imaginary borders of nations can we create a better world.(7)

5.James Petras has a criteria for judging anti-imperialist governments:
"Do they pay the foreign debt to US and European banks; do they respect the privatization of strategic industries; do they promote new privatizations; do they keep their markets open to overseas exporters; do they support the dollar against the euro by holding their
reserves in dollars; do they pass regressive labor, pension and minimum wage legislation; do they abide by IMF agreements and impose austerity programs and regressive tax laws?" Add to this list, bans on GMOs. Why let Monsanto or Dow or any non-local company control your seed or farm production? Chavez banned GMOs – Lula legalized them.


Series: Lessons Learned
Part I: Lessons Learned _ ANDES__ http://real-left.tripod.com/index.blog?start=1108598178


A Global War is on, and the only subjects worth studying; organizing or executing are those that can change the whole system in a short time. The target is always to stop the USA: Get USA military-espionage programs and USA-backed death squads out of all countries; and create an appealing and diverse counter-power to USA hegemony. (9)


A Hierarchy of Socio-Political Evolution:
How to Change the World:
Applied Resistance by Movements & States

I. Stop the USA Economic Cancer and Imperialist Aggression
a. Build Revolutionary Coalitions in Latin America: First in the Andes where Revolutions are Ripe and the Indigenous Populations are the Highest.
b. Raise Billions of Dollars to Help these Groups and Anyone Fighting Capitalism in the Andes (10)

II. Force the USA – EU – OECD to Consume Less and to Pollute Much Less.
a. Reduce USA Corporate Profits Through Trade Barriers (Tariffs and Quotas), Embargos, Debt Erasures, Boycotts and the Expropriation of USA Corporate Holdings. Expel Everything and Everyone Connected to the USA and Seize Their Stolen Possessions. (11)
b. Make the USA-EU Empires Pay Higher Oil Prices With Oil Embargos or by Utilizing Most of the Oil Within the South. Charge the USA Surcharges for Oil Purchases (& other products) and Require Them to Use Ships and Refineries in the South.

III. Defend and Build up the Revolutions in the South
a. Prepare Strategies to Resist USA Imperialist Attacks. The Best Defense is a Strong People with a Clear Ideology, Decentralized Economy and Decentralized Mobile Armed Forces. (12)

IV. Build a Personal and Social Consciousness of the Importance of the Environment to Self Reliance, Solidarity and National Defense
a. Solidarity Economics: A Solidaristic Decentralized Cooperative and Local-Oriented Economy.
b. Education (Latin America) for Solidarity and Eco-protection/ Sustainability. (13)

V. Issues and Variables: Time.
a. Does anyone think that time is an important factor? b. How do we factor the uncertainty of the timeframe concerning the issues of global warming’s peak or the next wave of US invasions into our models and plans for resistance? (14)


USA activist like to tout: Peace, Justice and Environmental Sustainability

So – First comes the war against capitalism (which is mostly a mental wof rejecting the brainwashing they feed us) and then the establishment of sustainable-oriented governments in the Andes and then in all of Latin America.
Then there will come the wars against US aggression andYankee invasions. Then we will be on the road to peace.
Then we do years of education and experiments in new theories of economic development, then we will be on the road to justice.
Then if there is an environment left we try to protect and restore it. Then we might be approaching the road to sustainable development. (15)

To move this hierarchy of needs and evolution along people in the USA-EU can send money, many skilled specialists and trades people to the revolutions in the Andes. Instead of growing frustrated with the inevitable defeats in the USA (failure to change anything) and the reality that protests and lobbying can actually encourage the right wing or the ignorant voters to fight change more, activists can earn strategic victories by aiding, visiting and organizing around the revolutions in the Andes. These People to People – or "Pueblo a People" campaigns can be positive and real.

Move beyond political stalemate to make a real difference. Forget politics as you knew it. Do the politics of building resistance. Forget lobbying and all environmental or social justice organizing in the USA. That won't work – never change anything soon.

The Andes have a lot to teach us and a world to win - a dollar a year from every person in the USA could make the difference.

Take the power where you can find it!



To build a counter-power to the imperialist USA, activist groups need to reach beyond national boundaries to build strong alliances in Latin America with indigenous people (40 to 80 million people), workers in the Andes (30 to 40 million people), African descendants (100,000,000 to 120,000,000 people), and to finance aid programs with Venezuelan and Andean revolutionary groups. Solidarity with these groups and the 200 million Latin American people trapped in neoliberal (USA-imposed) poverty can yield dividends abroad and within the USA. (16)


Without a rapid decline in consumption in the rich countries all environmental issues are hopeless and the chances of meaningful social change are non-existent. Resource wars and wars of imperialism will be the only issues left. These are the challenges and time limits that we face. (17)

KEY POINTS

1. US Enviros have killed the environmental movement and the Narrow Left strategies of single issue campaigning have failed.

warming because the capitalist model of consumption growth and rampant pollution to reduce costs combines with US greed to guarantee massive increases in greenhouse gases.

3. To survive in this post-global warming future of brutal US imperialist wars, the few remaining moral people in the US and Europe should fund revolutions in the Andes to create an alternative model and a counter to US hegemony.

4. There are billions of dollars in potential funding up for grabs in the US and Europe. The deceptions and failures of the Narrow left and the Enviros has created a vacuum where people are looking for something positive to invest in.

5. There is a process or hierarchy of resistance and movement building that can guide our efforts to stop imperialism and protect the environment. The basis of this hierarchy is that we must be honest and probing about our goals (near term and long run); about the strategies that could achieve them; and deeply open to debate and to clearer thinking than in the past.

The Real Left needs to make sense - AND be understandable, with real solutions to all of the linked problems.


HUGO CHAVEZ: "Imperialism not invincible!

... Look at Vietnam, Iraq and Cuba resisting, and now look at Venezuela… Some people say that we cannot say nor do anything that can irritate those in Washington. I offer you the words of Argentine independence hero Jose de San Martin:

‘Let's be free without caring what anyone else says.’” -- Hugo Chavez, President of Venezuela

If Alexander Cockburn Tariq Ali, Jeffery St. Claire, Hugo Chavez, the MST in Brazil and Bolivia, Felipe Quispe, James Petras, Walden Bello, Vandana Shiva, Arhundati Roy, Ken Livingston, Ward Churchill, the German Greens/ EU Nordic/Left Blocs, the Uruguayan Leftists, the Chilean Communist Party, Ruben Zamora, the Cubans, radical ecologists, other activists and professors would come forward with all of their power to support a clear plan for a new type of participatory socialist – or solidaristic - economy then many people, activists and movements would come together from around the world to promote this vision.

The deadlock of US-world politics would be broken and with some luck and hard work the South would begin to construct the vibrant models that are possible there.


INTERCONTINENTAL ACTIONS FOR PARTICIPATORY DEVELOPMENT

Visit the Bolivarian Revolution of Hugo Chavez.

Go Venezuela ! -Build the Base for Real Change! & Bridges of Solidarity with the Indigenous -Worker Alliances Fighting Corruption & USA Drug Wars in Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru and Colombia!

REVOLUTION NOT HARD:

There is a Way of Living Better Than What-Exists! Learn To-Make-It-Happen ... Educate Revolutions of Solidaristic Societies of Dignity for Indigenous People & All Workers; Health for All Including the Environment; Pure Food & Water; Women & Children::::::::::::::::

See Links:

WWW.MER130.tripod.com

Mescuelas_Revolt@yahoo.com

Venezuela … Vive ! Chavez … Sigue...

Venezuela … Sigue !! Chavez Vive . ..........

Posted by mer130 at 6:34 PM EDT
Post Comment | Permalink
Wednesday, 16 March 2005
Venezuela Economics Short
President Hugo Chavez Frias in Calcutta: We must invent 21st Century Socialism. Addressing a mass rally in Calcutta (India), Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez Frias has called on African, Asian and Latin American countries to reinvent socialism for the 21st century.

http://www.handsoffvenezuela.org/venezuela_elections_defeat_opposition.htm

Economics SHort # I

Economic Performance and Problems


Manufacturing increased 53.9% during the first quarter and continued strong in areas of production such as vehicles, textiles and wooden products. Civil construction, which has a great impact on employment, increased 40.7% in this period. The first half of 2004 manufacturing, commercial activities and construction increased 37.9%, 34.9% and 33.6%. Family consumption increased 4.2% in the fourth quarter of 2003, 7.9% in the first quarter of 2004 and 13.5% in the second quarter. The recovery has silenced a government opposition that insisted on the idea of a "statistical rebound." Venezuela had to survive attacks from those who aimed at destroying national oil production, and the whole country as well. Fortunately, reserve resources of the Venezuelan people made those suicidal attempts end up in the garbage can."

During the first seven months of the year, iron & steel production increased 13% and the government has been promoting metal-mechanic and automotive activities through a joint program with China. The objective is to develop assembly plants to make buses, motorcycles, cars, trains and electrical outlets. To support these projects, the Chavez' government is modernizing the hydro- electric facilities in Guri. Even though Venezuela has the greatest heavy oil reserve in the world, the sixth greatest of non-heavy oil and 3,6 billion cubic meters of proven reserves of natural gas, almost 70% of Venezuela's energy comes from hydropower dams in Bolivar State, close to the border with Brazil.

In Venezuela, agriculture was held back by oil related economy and it historically represents 5% of the GDP. This year, some states have already broken records in the production of beans, cotton, rice, corn, onions and milk. There are motivation schemes for the production of chicken, cattle, pigs and these conditions will allow the country to decrease import levels of these products. Many of the areas of crop growing are rural properties organized in cooperatives, specially around the Social Program "Vuelvan Caras". Some of them provide for "Mercal", the network of food and goods that has the purpose of controlling prices of basic products. Divestments and property regulations for unproductive land have been applied according to the terms of the Land Law of 2001. Nevertheless, there are a lot of owners involved who have benefited from the productive process.

It is common to hear that the Chavez government has benefited from high oil prices, but the amounts received by the current government due to oil exports are lower than the ones received by the five previous administrations. This government has received 26% of the oil exports income received during the first period of Carlos Andres Perez (1974-79), 35% of the one received during Luis Herrera Campins' period (1974-89), 56% of the amount received by Jaime Lusinchi (1984-89), 49% of the amount received during the second period of Carlos Andres Perez (1989-93) and 85% of the amount received by Rafael Caldera. If oil prices remain at US $30 per barrel until the end of the year, in 2004 Venezuela received 60% of the oil income received in 1974, Nobrega said. The then president of PDVSA and ex-Secretary General of OPEC, Ali Rodriguez, said that, in order to receive the amounts received in 1974, each oil barrel would have to be worth US$73. It is also important to highlight the fact that by the beginning of 1999, one oil barrel was worth US$9, which is 303% less than a barrel of Coca Cola.


It is well known that since 1970 there has been a drop in the oil industry's fiscal contribution. These contributions represented 21.5% of the GDP during the first period of Carlos Andres Perez, 17.9% during the period of Campins, 11.3% during Lusinchi's government, 15.9% during the second period of Carlos Andres Perez and 9.3% during Caldera's administration. In 1998, the year Chavez was elected, this indicator reached 5.5% of the GDP, the lowest in history. Chavez wanted to revert this situation, causing immediate reactions among compromised sectors, which led to the coup d'etat, the lockout and sabotages against economy. Between 1999 and 2002, oil industry's fiscal contribution, in average, represented 8.9% of the GDP, with a tendency to go up. In October, one of the taxes applied to one of the oil companies that operate in the Faja del Orinoco was increased from 1% to 16.6% of the selling price per barrel. "We are still dismantling the former appeasing and non-patriotic PDVSA, that used to make deals based on corporative interests. We are entering the real era of nationalization of black gold. National sovereignty is a priority, instead of neo liberalism", Chavez said, at the time of that announcement.

Another important fact: between 1974 and 2004, Venezuelan population will grow from 12.3 million to 26 million. This means that oil income per capita today is lower. Even with lower oil incomes, this government (in real terms and per capita) has a public spending of 30% of the GDP, which is over the average of former governments. Chavez' government is well known for its investments in health, education, housing, safety and infrastructure at unprecedented levels. For the fist time, oil resources go directly to the gross of the population as part of a plan to defuse poverty generators. The 2001 Census showed that 63% of the population lives in poor villages or marginal areas. Chavez proposes the democratization of capital in order to finance endogenous development areas, cooperatives, micro, small and medium size businesses.


There are three mechanisms to launch this plan: public investment, social programs and private investments. PDVSA was turned into a weapon to fight against poverty using resources to cover basic needs of the population and promote programs for professional training. Social program are not only ways to solve insufficiency problems in alimentary, analphabetism, unemployment and social exclusion areas. The idea is to incorporate into the productive sector, masses that have been historically excluded. This is done through a network of social program managed by the recently formed Ministry of Popular Economy. "Inclusion policies surpass the 'assistance approach' given by rentistic models. The objective is to create mechanisms to help overcome poverty, through permanent training, creation of jobs, defense of real salary and guarantees of public services that get better every day", explains Elias Jaua.


The third front is private investment, which represents 75% of the internal aggregate offer and is the core of gross capital generation in Venezuela. Mostly after winning the recall in August, Chavez has had important meetings with business people of different regions and productive sector, with the objective of collecting enough resources to form a national airline, a telecommunications company, the recovery of productive structures and agricultural plans.

These measures also seek to increase relations among Latin American countries in what Chavez calls the Bolivarian integration project. As an example, the recent inclusion of Venezuela in Mercosur and the different meetings held with governments and business people of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Uruguay. Luciano Wexell -

lwexell@bancoex.com
http://www.vheadline.com/readnews.asp?id=26925


Advise:

There are several mechanisms that Chavez could use to decentralize capital: a surcharge on bank loans to large companies or those not allowing worker democracy ; subsidized loans to cooperatives and small import substitution or agricultural producers. A more permanent solution is the nationalization and localization of banking operations with community councils deciding within national standards how investments should be prioritized – arbitration and audit functions could guide and resolve most conflicts in this area.


Posted by mer130 at 5:32 PM EST
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Chavez Socialism I
http://www.handsoffvenezuela.org/meeting_chavez_workers_madrid.htm

Chavez speaking in Madrid Novemeber 2004

“Why can’t we form a democratic and revolutionary international? Unite all the oppressed peoples, the workers, the indigenous peoples ...”. There is another standing ovation. He develops the idea: “the working class must be the vanguard of the revolution (...) It should not only concern itself with immediate or wage demands, which are necessary and must be fought for, but it must also look beyond, to the transformation of society as a whole”. The enthusiasm is overwhelming. “Long live the working class”, and “the working class has no borders” are slogans which become alive and are shouted by the whole audience as one.

During the speech, standing up, he has been given cups of coffee which he drank. It has been a very packed day. He was at the Complutense University, where the students also received him with enthusiasm, surpassing all expectations. He met with Zapatero, with artists and intellectuals in the Circulo de Bellas Artes, and then at 10:30 pm he met with the workers... The best part of it, he snubbed a meeting with big business. Today the media complain and say this is not acceptable because he snubbed a meeting with 200 “business leaders”. Today, workers understand more who Chavez is and the support he receives from Venezuelan workers.

It is past 11:30 and finally he says goodbye. As he leaves the hall, as when he came in, there is a standing ovation. We are all shouting, “the revolution forward, forward, and those who do not like it, will have to stand it” (“La revolucion p’alante, p’alante y al que no le guste que se joda y que se aguante”.)


“Capitalism leads us straight to hell…The idea of a “Third Way” as a solution to capitalism: capitalism with a human face, is like trying to give the monster a mask… But this mask has fallen to the floor shattered by reality”. -=-

http://www.handsoffvenezuela.org/chavez_opposition_capitalism.htm




Posted by mer130 at 5:30 PM EST
Post Comment | Permalink
Thursday, 10 March 2005

^^ PCPD-R ^^ INTERNACIONAL for Post Capitalist Participatory Democracy Revolucion PCPD-R






































POINTS FOR REVOLUTIONARY

POLICY FORMATION



(Decision-Time)



1. National and global social movements need to embrace a practical and focused goal of accumulating power in order to takeover governments. Conventional politics and left-thinking in the USA are dead.


2. The only effective means of altering the balance of power in the US (and thus the world) are armed struggle; relocating activists and supporters of change to states in the USA where they can seize power; or through massive financial aid to the revolutions in the Andes. Protests, lobbying and voting are stupid. They actually aid the power elite who want the appearance of democracy and opposition ? as long as it can accomplish nothing. (6)


3. The leaders of USA environmental and justice groups are barriers to change. The debate is whether to try new strategies or fall back on style and simply modify the current moderate plan of merging left issues together in a coalition with moderate democrats ? a strategy where victory becomes as meaningless as defeat!


4. The USA is an empire of corporate, trade and, military alliances. Only through extending our conceptions of politics ? which is another word for Power ? extending it beyond the imaginary borders of nations can we create a better world.(7)


5.James Petras has a criteria
for judging anti-imperialist governments:

"Do they pay the foreign debt to US and European banks; do they respect the privatization of strategic industries; do they promote new privatizations; do they keep their markets open to overseas exporters; do they support the dollar against the euro by holding their reserves in dollars; do they pass regressive labor, pension and minimum wage legislation; do they abide by IMF agreements and impose austerity programs and regressive tax laws?" Add to this list, bans on GMOs. Why let Monsanto or Dow or any non-local company control your seed or farm production? Chavez banned GMOs ? Lula legalized them.



Series Part I: http://real-left.tripod.com/index.blog?start=1108598178


A Global War is on, and the only subjects worth studying; organizing or executing are those that can change the whole system in a short time. The target is always to stop the USA: Get USA military-espionage programs and USA-backed death squads out of all countries; and create an appealing and diverse counter-power to USA hegemony. (9)




A Hierarchy of Socio-Political Evolution:

How to Change the World:
Applied Resistance by Movements & States


I. Stop the USA Economic Cancer and Imperialist Aggression
a. Build Revolutionary Coalitions in Latin America: First in the Andes where Revolutions are Ripe and the Indigenous Populations are the Highest.
b. Raise Billions of Dollars to Help these Groups and Anyone Fighting Capitalism in the Andes (10)

II. Force the USA ? EU ? OECD to Consume Less and to Pollute Much Less.
a. Reduce USA Corporate Profits Through Trade Barriers (Tariffs and Quotas), Embargos, Debt Erasures, Boycotts and the Expropriation of USA Corporate Holdings. Expel Everything and Everyone Connected to the USA and Seize Their Stolen Possessions. (11)
b. Make the USA-EU Empires Pay Higher Oil Prices With Oil Embargos or by Utilizing Most of the Oil Within the South. Charge the USA Surcharges for Oil Purchases (& other products) and Require Them to Use Ships and Refineries in the South.

III. Defend and Build up the Revolutions in the South
a. Prepare Strategies to Resist USA Imperialist Attacks. The Best Defense is a Strong People with a Clear Ideology, Decentralized Economy and Decentralized Mobile Armed Forces. (12)

IV. Build a Personal and Social Consciousness of the Importance of the Environment to Self Reliance, Solidarity and National Defense
a. Solidarity Economics: A Solidaristic Decentralized Cooperative and Local-Oriented Economy.
b. Education (Latin America) for Solidarity and Eco-protection/ Sustainability. (13)

V. Issues and Variables:
Time.
a. Does anyone think that time is an important factor?
b. How do we factor the uncertainty of the timeframe concerning the issues of global warming?s peak or the next wave of US invasions into our models and plans for resistance? (14)



USA activist like to tout:

Peace, Justice and Environmental Sustainability


So ? First comes the war against capitalism
(which is mostly a mental war of rejecting the brainwashing they feed us) and then the establishment of sustainable-oriented governments in the Andes and then in all of Latin America.
Then there will come the wars against US aggression and Yankee invasions.
Then we will be on the road to peace.
Then we do years of education and experiments in new theories oeconomic development, then we will be on the road to justice.

Then if there is an environment left we try to protect and restore it. Then we might be approaching the road to sustainable development. (15)

To move this hierarchy of needs and evolution along people in the USA-EU can send money, many skilled specialists and trades people to the revolutions in the Andes.

Instead of growing frustrated with the inevitable defeats in the USA (failure to change anything) and the reality that protests and lobbying can actually encourage the right wing or the ignorant voters to fight change more, activists can earn strategic victories by aiding, visiting and organizing around the revolutions in the Andes.

! These People to People ? or "Pueblo a People" campaigns can be positive and real.



Move beyond political stalemate to make a real difference. Forget politics as you knew it. Do the politics of building resistance. Forget lobbying and all environmental or social justice organizing in the USA. That won't work ? never change anything soon.

The Andes have a lot to teach us and a world to win - a dollar a year from every person in the USA could make the difference.


! Take the power where you can find it !





To build a counter-power
to the imperialist USA, activist groups need to reach beyond national boundaries to build strong alliances in Latin America with indigenous people (40 to 80 million people), workers in the Andes (30 to 40 million people), African descendants (100,000,000 to 120,000,000 people), and to finance aid programs with Venezuelan and Andean revolutionary groups. Solidarity with these groups and the 200 million Latin American people trapped in neoliberal (USA-imposed) poverty can yield dividends abroad and within the USA. (16)

Without a rapid decline in consumption in the rich countries all environmental issues are hopeless and the chances of meaningful social change are non-existent. Resource wars and wars of imperialism will be the only issues left. These are the challenges and time limits that we face. (17)


^^ KEY POINTS

1. US Enviros have killed the environmental movement and the Narrow Left strategies of single issue campaigning have failed.
2. There is no way to avoid the catastrophe of global warming because the capitalist model of consumption growth and rampant pollution to reduce costs combines with US greed to guarantee massive increases in greenhouse gases.
3. To survive in this post-global warming future of brutal US imperialist wars, the few remaining moral people in the US and Europe should fund revolutions in the Andes to create an alternative model and a counter to US hegemony.
4. There are billions of dollars in potential funding up for grabs in the US and Europe. The deceptions and failures of the Narrow left and the Enviros has created a vacuum where people are looking for something positive to invest in.
5. There is a process or hierarchy of resistance and movement building that can guide our efforts to stop imperialism and protect the environment. The basis of this hierarchy is that we must be honest and probing about our goals (near term and long run); about the strategies that could achieve them; and deeply open to debate and to clearer thinking than in the past. The Real Left needs to make sense - AND be understandable, with real solutions to all of the linked problems.


HUGO CHAVEZ:
"Imperialism not invincible!
Look at Vietnam, Iraq and Cuba resisting, and now look at Venezuela? Some people say that we cannot say nor do anything that can irritate those in Washington. I offer you the words of Argentine independence hero Jose de San Martin:

?Let's be free without caring
what anyone else says.??
-- Hugo Chavez, President of Venezuela


If Alexander Cockburn Tariq Ali, Jeffery St. Claire, Hugo Chavez, the MST in Brazil and Bolivia, Felipe Quispe, James Petras, Walden Bello, Vandana Shiva, Arhundati Roy, Ken Livingston, Ward Churchill, the German Greens/ EU Nordic/Left Blocs, the Uruguayan Leftists, the Chilean Communist Party, Ruben Zamora, the Cubans, radical ecologists, other activists and professors would come forward with all of their power to support a clear plan for a new type of participatory socialist ? or solidaristic - economy then many people, activists and movements would come together from around the world to promote this vision.


The deadlock of US-world politics would be broken and with some luck and hard work the South would begin to construct the vibrant models that are possible there.

... (Who else could help??)(19)


___ INTERCONTINENTAL ACTIONS FOR
____ PARTICIPATORY = DEVELOPMENT


Visit the Bolivarian Revolution of Hugo Chavez.

Go Venezuela ! - Build the Base for Real Change! & Bridges of Solidarity with the Indigenous -Worker Alliances Fighting Corruption & USA Drug Wars in Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru and Colombia!


REVOLUTION NOT HARD

There is a Way of Living Better Than What-Exists!
Learn To-Make-It-Happen ...

Educate Revolutions of Solidaristic Societies
of Dignity for Indigenous People & All
Workers; Health for All Including the
Environment; Pure Food & Water;

Women & Children::::::::::::::::


See Links:

WWW.MER130.tripod.com


Mescuelas_Revolt@yahoo.com




^^ Venezuela Vive ! Chavez Sigue . ...



^^^ Venezuela ? Sigue! Chavez Vive . ..............







Posted by mer130 at 2:52 PM EST
Updated: Monday, 14 March 2005 5:07 PM EST
Post Comment | Permalink
Wednesday, 26 January 2005
A NEW POLITICAL ECONOMY - Structures and Guides
Topic: MER Policies - 3rdWorld
II. A NEW POLITICAL ECONOMY - Structures and Guides

FALLUJA --- OR ...




TRADITIONAL INDIGENOUS FARMING AND LIVING IN HARMONY
YOU HAVE THE CHOICE _ BUT NOT FOR LONG ...



Capitalism pretends that all needs are provided for by maximizing corporate profits. But despite huge expensive bureaucracies the rich countries still have serious social problems concerning health, education and crime. The MER Solidaristic Policies model maximizes food security; health and well-being; participation; a practical education; the values and benefits of cooperation; and a goal of many equalities.





We are sure that such policies can produce enough (social) profits to satisfy basic needs for development: the people empowered.


1. Extreme taxation of all foreign and elite owned businesses, bank accounts and resources to accomplish state takeover at the lowest cost and minimal disruptions.

2. Extreme tariffs on the imports from all non-aligned nations.

3. Extensive programs for the relocation of urban people to rural areas for production and for defense.

4. Education for solidarity and revolutionary economics, society and consciousness.



Program of Revolutionary Takeover of a Country like Bolivia or Peru



I. Short Transition Period (First 3 Weeks) : Immediate Priorities

The development path for Bolivia and Ecuador and Peru is quite similar. The poor and their allies must seize most of the land and all valuable industries, assets and bank accounts. The first thing that a new government does is to seize the banks, institute currency controls, and seal its borders to prevent capital or equipment flight. We assume that the armed forces and the police remain loyal to the people and all suspect individuals and units would be demobilized or jailed.



Security and law and order are the next responsibilities. Soldiers and police not required for protection of vital installations should be assigned to neighborhood or regional assemblies to be deployed as requested by these local authorities (worker-soldier alliance). Lists of critical jobs should be drawn up by the assemblies and the positions necessary are filled. Garbage collection, water supply, electricity (rationed), and emergency medical needs are at the top with sewage disposal and heating or cooling next. The central government's primary role other than security is to seize all food supplies and critical parts (equipment) and to distribute it fairly according to need and circumstances (weather, poverty and breakdowns). The government should also distribute transport vehicles and fuel supplies as best it can.



II. Phase II of Transition Period (First 3 months) : Beginning Long-Run Priorities


The two primary requirements during the first 3 months is to further develop and secure the neighborhood and regional assembly operations, effectiveness and organization; second to prioritize all productive factors (money, skills, workers and material) for long run production of basic goods and the factors required to produce them. Food, electricity, transport and water



III. ECONOMIC POLICIES: Slow Version -



This is macro - kind of - then the data and conclusions examine price and supply curves under these macro conditions - increased investment and increased consumption level - how to keep prices low -

1. Credit controls

2. Public Land give to organizations and sustainable farming coops.

3. Modest Credit programs

4. Increase taxes - corporations and the rich and idle lands -

5. Partial decentralization

6. Increase minimum wages

7. Regional Employment

8. Import Substitution

9. Modest re-nationalization

Phase II - of Go Slow -

1. All of above - but more - and faster...

2. More linkages that support import substitution -

3. Military construction projects

4. Links across borders - rural development

5. Government purchases of lands and confiscations -

6. Increase taxes on medium size farms and some small ( or income tax)

7. Limits on land ownership

8. Re-location projects to rural areas

9. Urban Land titles and confiscations - purchases etc.

10. Education for Solidarity



Fast Econ Program -

-- Do all of above quickly. Get rid of US $ and end trade with those aligned with the US. Fire most of the upper level military - immediately! Put half of the military to work like in Venezuela - Plan Bolivar.



Many people have known about policies that would improve conditions for rural people. An example is found in the demands made by highland Indians in Ecuador. Conaie and Ecuarunari led the Indian uprising of 1990, helped by Confeniae. From the platform that the occupation of the Santo Domingo church provided, the leadership disseminated a succinct program:



1. Return of lands and territories taken from indigenous communities, without costly legal fees

2. Sufficient water for both human consumption and irrigation in the indigenous communities, and an environmental plan to prevent contamination of water supplies

3. No payment of the municipal taxes levied on the small properties owned by indigenous farmers

4. Creation of long-term financing for bilingual education programs in the communities

5. Creation of provincial and regional credit agencies under the control of Conaie

6. Debt pardon for all debts indigenous communities have incurred with government ministries and banks

7. Reform of the first article of the Ecuadorian Constitution such that it recognizes Ecuador as a multinational state

8. Immediate delivery of funds and credits currently assigned to the indigenous nationalities

9. A minimum two-year price freeze on all raw materials and manufactured goods used by the communities in agricultural production, and a reasonable price increase for all agricultural products sold by the communities, relying upon free-market mechanisms

10. Initiation and termination of all necessary and priority construction of basic infrastructure in the indigenous communities

11. Unrestricted import and export privileges for indigenous artisans and merchants of artisan-craft

12. National legislation and enforcement in favor of strict protection and controlled exploration of archaeological sites under the supervision of Conaie

13. Expulsion of the Summer Institute of Linguistics (SIL, a missionary group), in accordance with Executive Decree 1159 of 1981

14. Respect for the rights of children and the raising of consciousness in the government regarding the actual state of affairs extant among children

15. National support for the practice of indigenous medicine

16. Immediate dismantling of organizations created by the political parties that parallel governmental institutions at the municipal and provincial levels, and which manipulate political consciousness and elections in the indigenous communities (Hoy 6/29/90) [ Bold denotes policies related to the rural economy ]





The Mararikulam Experiment is an alternative to corporate dominated globalization.




It is an example of the kinds of policies that :



1. show that poor people in the 3rd world can generate significant economic growth without international corporate investment;

2. create an economy with substantial resistance barriers to corporate domination: the soap production and many other products will generate jobs that are insulated from multinational corporate practices of moving into a region and then leaving to escape upward wage pressures;

3. make more efficient use of local raw materials than would a vertically integrated international corporate production process;

4. reinforce local democracy, participation, and empowerment of ordinary people. The goals of the Mararikulam Experiment include developing an economy that is egalitarian and a political structure that allows for the greatest possible democratic participation of workers and consumers in designing their own products.

5. provide an example to others of the power of cooperatives as engines of economic growth and development that simultaneously promote social justice and support communities.



-- The Mararikulam Experiment: Women-Owned Cooperatives in Kerala, India: A People's Alternative to Corporate Dominated Globalization; by Richard W. Franke, 2002. Local Democracy and Development: The Kerala People's Campaign for Decentralized Planning. Boulder CO: Westview Press.



For the Preservation of Domestic Security and Self Defense:


1. Restrict travel by the wealthy (Venezuelans and others) and require background checks of US, Colombian and Haitian citizens entering Venezuela (or other aligned places).

2.Maintain strict currency controls and broaden investigations of tax paying by US and opposition connected businesses and organizations.

3. Expose the connections between the Cisneros clan, the AUC/Colombian elite, the Miami-Cuban CIA mafia and Spanish rightwing drug dealers (and US and Mexican Banks!)

4. Phase out US Embassies, all US government operations, most US NGOs and all US corporations and other related associati

5. Accept only Euro currency for oil and other exports (until a regional currency is adopted). Institute surcharges on all US ships, airplanes and US exports and imports. Venezuela Econ Policies http://vheadline.com/readnews.asp?id=16154

6. Stop oil and other exports to US client regimes in the region: Colombia, Dominican Republic, Aruba, Curacao.

7. Sell national assets that are outside of your country (CITIGO in Venezuela's case). Assist Bolivia and other friendly countries with their energy projects and operations. Start bio-diesel plantations and processing facilities in regions with few energy sources.

8. Place high tariffs on all luxury goods.


MISC. Development ideas -
Do inventories of natural resources, public resources (lands and schools etc ). Data on trade on faring put puts and inputs - on forest resources and problem areas. Hydro potentials with a priority to the cheapest, least disruptive and most needed places - (social - or small scale econ dev priorities. )

Inventory crafts outputs and investigate their expanded market potential. Tourism and risks associated with it.

Natural resources - especially coal, oil, gas and forests (or impacts) - are set to the highest criteria. - Why - easy - future value plus limited availability plus ecological problems will be easier to remedy or avoid in the future. - If you let them go dormant for a while they will have more - Forests - or they will be worth more and easier to extract. Plus less infrastructure is required so quickly -- or it evolves better and cleaner too. Invest instead in schools, teachers and revolutionary criteria that will help people come up with more creative and practical and socially profitable goals and methods. -

Reduce erosion, build smarter and focus skills and investments on import substitution (ISE ) products and techniques.

The goal and the planning and the university and high school research is all on how to improve and facilitate the alternative econ program of solidarity and social economy - For example: students would design or compare (dissection) foreign models of motors or engines and test them and see which were best and worst and then redesign them for local production - or a cheap method (justified by overall ISE program).


TACTICS of Strategic Effect:

TAXATION USED TO BANKRUPT FOREIGN OR ELITE Factories and interests. - use the government power - condemnation and public good/benefits... Buyouts with low fixed exchange rate payments - and then devalue the currency a lot. - Or just simply nationalize and promise to pay... or not...


In some studies factor in the expected increases in regional and neighbor nation trade that can offset loses to the US or other more hostile countries.


... Un MUNDO Lleno de Escuelas Revolucionarias,

CONTACT: mescuelas_revolt@yahoo.com



Posted by mer130 at 11:26 PM EST
Updated: Wednesday, 26 January 2005 11:34 PM EST
Post Comment | Permalink
Tuesday, 25 January 2005
George W Bush's Eternal Triumph or The Andes to the Rescue of the World
Topic: Series LESSONS LEARNED




One day, in the arid region of northeastern Brazil, one of the most famine-stricken parts of the world, I (Clodovis) met a bishop going into his house; he was shaking. "Bishop, what's the matter?" I asked. He replied that he had just seen a terrible sight: in front of the cathedral was a woman with three small children and a baby clinging to her neck. He saw that they were fainting from hunger. The baby seemed to be dead. He said: "Give the baby some milk, woman!" "I can't, my lord," she answered. The bishop went on insisting that she should, and she that she could not. Finally, because of his insistence, she opened her blouse. Her breast was bleeding; the baby sucked violently at it. And sucked blood. The mother who had given it life was feeding it, like the pelican, with her own blood, her own life. The bishop knelt down in front of the woman, placed his hand on the baby's head, and there and then vowed that as long as such hunger existed, he would feed at least one hungry child each day.
-- From Introducing Liberation Theology
http://www.landreform.org/reading0.htm

The 5-Part Series:
Lessons Learned:


From The Failure of Politics and Vision in North America
To the Steady Victories of the Social Movements in South America,


by Mundo de Escuelas Revolucionarias (MER)



Part I. :


U.S.A. George W Bush's Eternal Triumph

or The Andes to the Rescue

of the World
(Short Version, Revised, February 20, 05)


By Jason Martin
CONTACT: c o n t a c t Jasonmartin7@lycos.com


"American imperialism has been in the works ever since Franklin Roosevelt encountered Winston Churchill a long time ago. Roosevelt concluded that he didn't like the British Empire but that the world needed something like it so long as we held the reins... Nothing was more convenient for us than Fidel Castro. Instead of saying we were supporting the United Fruit Company in Guatemala, we could contend that we were protecting these poor Guatemalans from the menace of Soviet influence and the influence of Fidel Castro. The Reagan administration gave Central America its worst decade since the Spanish conquest. It's a travesty what we did to places like El Salvador and Guatemala. And it worries me today that John Negroponte has been appointed ambassador to Iraq. He was the ambassador to Honduras in the 1980s, when Honduras was the largest single CIA station on earth, carrying out counterrevolutionary attacks against the Sandinistas in Nicaragua. He should be answering charges of war crimes carried out by the Reagan administration."

-- Chalmers Johnson; http://www.inmotionmagazine.com/global/cj_int/cj_int2.html



National and global social movements need to embrace a practical and focused goal of accumulating power in order to takeover governments. Conventional politics and left-thinking in the USA are dead.


We can all have our personalized utopian goals - and they are pretty much all the same - but goals are not tactics or strategy and personal desires have to be delayed in the struggle for a general solution to the crises of the planet and of the human spirit. A strategy of resistance and effective tactics for the coming brutal struggles against Killer-Capitalism are what we need - not circular reasoning from shallow anarchists or the non-violence gurus with their Means-Are-the-Ends Tele-Tubbie hype.


A future of Anarchist principles?

Yes, a world of decentralized power and local autonomy is possibly 25-50 years away if people start thinking and create viable strategies now. What we face for the next 15 to 20 years is a bloody and probably futile struggle against a vicious and well-armed (weapons/propaganda) fascist regime: the USA Empire.

The USA movements for change, for Fair Trade and against Killer-Capitalism's wars and ecological destruction have to come together to oppose the USA Empire. To understand why this needs to happen and how it can be accomplished -- one must better understand the world.

It is limiting to think about the USA or national politics. It is better to not believe that the USA exists anymore. It is an empire of corporate, trade and, military alliances. This is what we fight and what must be addressed.

As President Abe Lincoln said:

"Now We are engaged in a great civil (world) war - testing whether this movement (or any movement so conceived and so dedicated) can long endure..."

Chavez and many anti-globalization / Zapatista activists call this the Fourth World War (4WW). Six hundred million capitalists against the rest of the world's 6000 million (6 billion). (1)


Cheer up, it is our great fortune that what we face is a global war - a war with and without borders, fronts or rears ... a war of everything against everything. Because in such a battle it is possible to mobilize within and to win. Whereas, politics and activism are completely dead in the USA and this is a permanent condition (Truth...) The USA has been moving to the right for 30 years. Surely since Reagan's victory in the 80's politics has been dead in the USA. All education since has failed...

The popularity and re-election/coronation of GW Bush should be enough evidence, but the power of the ultra-right and the rightwing in the USA Congress (& most states) makes the debate moot and tired. Authors have witnessed this death of compassion, virtue and political being in the USA: Petras, Cockburn, St.Clair, Rosenbraugh, Jensen... (2) More sign on each week: Hertsgaard, Nordhaus, Shellenberger and Tariq Ali (3)

(See fascist John Kerry(4))

Only through extending our conceptions of politics - which is another word for Power - extending it beyond the imaginary borders of nations can we create a better world. (6)

The efforts of the thousands of foundations and NGOs in the USA and most countries have been extreme failures. If they do not wake up to their impotence and the raging power of GW Bush and the hungry USA consumers, then they are to blame for the genocide and ecocide that follows. (7)

If USA activist groups are honest, then they will quickly admit that they have no meaningful goals and that their strategies of education or mobilization cannot overcome the strong right wing drift of US political culture. To apply outdated techniques of organizing or resisting against such a force is to make yourself and your power meaningless and impotent. To continue these strategies that knowingly waste money (power) and offer false hope, borders on the criminal. There is nothing people in the USA can do to stop USA imperialism and the destruction of the global environment from within the USA - unless you are considering armed struggle or being able to mobilize millions of protesters who want to be beaten and imprisoned.


... Or so logic and frankness would suggest. But we have a new idea that could re-invigorate and make powerful the movement for change in North America:


Everyone should cease working politically at any level in the USA. They should refrain from current forms of activism (ecological, social or cultural). Instead activists must put their energy, skills and finances into groups in South America: groups in the Andes and Venezuela.


Yes.


The only activity of real value to changing the world - to defeating capitalism and militarism - is to form a fundraising group. (8)


USA people give three to five billion dollars a year to environmental and social change groups, in the last year people gave the democratic party over 1 billion dollars. Imagine if 10 percent of this money went to actually building resistance in South America - 300 million dollars !!! (9)

By organizing across artificial borders to build a vibrant and diverse alternative, the left in the USA, EU and in Latin America can change the dynamics and escape the Killer-Capitalists' traps. Inspiration and new spaces in which to accumulate power can be carved out of the Empire's weaknesses.


You might think that we are being extreme to say that there is nothing you can do in the USA to aid the Andean Region (or anywhere) through politics or education. Think about it... where are the lasting victories against USA imperialism and injustice? How can groups claim to have had any effect given the state of domestic politics and the foreign aggression of the USA today? (Not to mention the USA's 50 year record of international lawlessness!) (10)


GW Bush's coronation speech should be enough of a warning that the USA intends to accelerate and expand their wars for oil - their wars of confusion and obfuscation - and the imperial wars of control and domination.


People can get together in cities across the USA and focus on something that produces effects and real signs of progress - like raising millions of dollars in aid for important groups in the Andes. Then they will have created a positive and growing movement in the USA and built up the Andean groups too.


This success would encourage more people to get involved and in the process they would learn about struggle, about the real issues facing those who want change and about the struggle in Latin America. The movement in both regions will grow and people will see what money and cooperation can do.


Videos, articles for publication and visits back and forth can build stronger ties and spread the word and inspire even more organizing, more donations and more tangible results.


Instead of growing frustrated with the defeats that are inevitable in the USA (failure to change anything) and the reality that protests and lobbying can encourage the right wing or the ignorant voters to fight change more, activists can feel good and earn strategic victories. These People to People - or Pueblo a People campaigns can be proud, positive and real. (11)

Move beyond political stalemate and make a real difference. Forget politics as you knew it - Do the politics of building resistance.

Forget lobbying, and all environmental, social justice and other organizing in the USA! It will never work - never change anything soon - and causes more problems than it solves. The Andes have a lot to teach us and a world to win - a dollar a year from every person in the USA could make the difference.



Take the power where you can find it!






_ __ Conclusion __


To build a counter-power to the imperialist USA, activist groups need to reach beyond national boundaries to build strong alliances in Latin America with indigenous people (40 to 80 million people), workers in the Andes (30 to 40 million people), African descendants (100,000,000 to 120,000,000 people), and to finance aid programs with Venezuelan and Andean revolutionary groups.

Solidarity with these groups and the 200 million Latin American people trapped in neoliberal (USA-imposed) poverty can yield huge dividends abroad and within the USA.


Take the power where you can find it!


-- Herstory repeats, History kills...

In 1545, rich silver deposits were found at POTOSI in modern BOLIVIA. Silver mining peaked in 1590. In 1610 the city had 160.000 inhabitants, which made it the world's 5th largest city. It produced 60 % of the world's silver production. The silver was annually shipped to Spain from Maracaibo by the SILVER FLEET (Treasure Fleet). Around two billion ounces of silver were extracted from the city's Cerro Rico (Rich Mountain) during the Spanish colonial era. Cerro Rico silver paved Potosi's streets, fuelled the European Renaissance and helped fund the "Invincible Armada", the Spanish fleet that sailed against Elizabethan England in 1588.

But today Potosi is dying. "When a mine closes, all that's left is a ghost town," says the city's mayor, Ren? Joaquino


In 1572, in colonial times, Spanish Viceroy Francisco de Toledo created a system of forced labour called "la mita". Every seven years, for a period of four months, all males between 18 and 50 were ordered to work in the mines. They were paid a pittance and rarely saw the light of day. Eighty per cent of the male population of the 16 provinces of the viceroyalty of Peru died in these conditions. "Every peso coin minted in Potosi has cost the life of 10 Indians who have died in the depths of the mines," wrote Fray Antonio de la Calancha in 1638.



Key Points - (Outline)



1. Social movements need to embrace a practical and focused goal of accumulating power in order to takeover governments.


2. Conventional politics and left-thinking in the USA are dead.


3. The only effective means of altering the balance of power in the US or the world are armed struggle; relocating activists and supporters of change to states in the USA where they can seize power; OR massive financial aid to the revolutions in the Andes. Protests, lobbying and voting (in the USA) are stupid. They actually aid the power elite who want the appearance of democracy and opposition - as long as it can accomplish nothing.


4. The leaders of USA environmental and justice groups are barriers to change. Analysts accept this and the debate is whether to try new strategies or else to fall back on style and simply modify the current moderate strategy of weakly merging the various lefty issues together in a grand coalition with the moderate democrats - a strategy where victory becomes as meaningless as defeat!


5. The USA is an empire of corporate, trade and, military alliances.


6. Only through extending our conceptions of politics - which is another word for Power - extending it beyond the imaginary borders of nations can we create a better world. (Note 6)



The continuing series:


Lessons Learned:


by Mundo de Escuelas Revolucionarias (MER)



PART II. )) Tsunamis Inside the Criticisms of the Left: Venezuela versus the Shams of the World

PART 2 Lessons Learnedhttp://mer130.tripod.com/index.blog?entry_id=620562



PART III.))

The Real Left is Defined by Decentralization

See Primer at:
http://zorpia.com/cgi/journal.cgi?journal_id=0001046278


PART IV.))

Why the Andes is the Best Target: Pre-emptive Revolutions




Around two billion ounces of silver were extracted from the city's Cerro Rico (Rich Mountain) during the Spanish colonial era. Cerro Rico silver paved Potosi's streets, fuelled the European Renaissance and helped fund the "Invincible Armada", the Spanish fleet that sailed against Elizabethan England in 1588.

But today Potosi is dying. "When a mine closes, all that's left is a ghost town," says the city's mayor, Ren? Joaquino

In 1572, in colonial times, Spanish Viceroy Francisco de Toledo created a system of forced labour called "la mita". Every seven years, for a period of four months, all males between 18 and 50 were ordered to work in the mines. They were paid a pittance and rarely saw the light of day. Eighty per cent of the male population of the 16 provinces of the viceroyalty of Peru died in these conditions. "Every peso coin minted in Potosi has cost the life of 10 Indians who have died in the depths of the mines," wrote Fray Antonio de la Calancha in 1638.






NOTES:

Note I.

For Zapatistas see:
http://www.inmotionmagazine.com/auto/fourth.html

For Anti-Globalization views see:
http://www.bignoisefilms.com/4ww/index.htm


For Hugo Chavez see: a. Venezuela Bolivariana (Movie) at https://www3.indymedia.org.uk/en/2004/08/296319.html
At the above site you can download the whole movie - requires quick time.

b. Or see: http://Chavez Economicswww.venezuelanalysis.com/news.php?newsno=1437


Adolfo Perez Esquivel, Nobel peace prize winner for his work in raising the issue of human rights violations in Latin America, read the final conclusions of the forum, entitled "The Caracas Declaration." The declaration outlines the need to build a front of global resistance against the project of domination that today is imposed by the current government of the United States of America and global organizations like the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF)."Let's get to work intensely," Chavez said. "Let's put the ideas concluded at this forum to work, let's make it a reality."


Note II. :
James Petras see:
Petras Website and Muy Mas www.rebelion.org


Alexander Cockburn and Jeffery St. Claire see:

COUNTERPUNCH.ORG

Or: http://New Left Reviewwww.newleftreview.net/NLR26301.shtml


Derrick Jensen see:

"I don't think most people care, and I don't think most people will ever care. We can trot out whatever polls we want to try to prove most Americans actually do care about the Environment, Justice, Sustainability - that they care about anything beyond being left alone to numb themselves with alcohol, cheap consumables, and television.
http://www.altpr.org/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=336&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0

Or: http://WHy It Must End www.derrickjensen.org


Craig Rosenbraugh see:
The Logic of Political Violence:

http://portland.indymedia.org/en/2003/11/274922.shtml
Or: http://www.arissamediagroup.com



Note III. :

Mark Hertsgaard see:
http://www.markhertsgaard.com/Articles/2004/EnviroChallenge/

The Big Lies: __ http://www.markhertsgaard.com/Articles/2005/KyotoCantSaveUs/


Michael Shellenberger see:
http://www.thebreakthrough.org/

"Most of the movement's leading thinkers, funders and advocates do not question their most basic assumptions about who we are, what we stand for, and what it is that we should be doing."


Ted Nordhaus see:
http://www.alternet.org/story/19396/

Or: Death to Enviros Debates: __ http://www.grist.org/news/maindish/2005/01/13/little-doe/


Tarij Ali see:

http://Why Activists Are Wrongwww.venezuelanalysis.com/articles.php?artno=1223


Note IV. :

a. See Fascist John Kerry & the psychosis that grows across the USA
: http://americas.org/item_15926)
What does it mean that Alabama voters (2004) refused to approve a constitutional amendment to erase segregation-era wording requiring separate schools for "white and colored children" and to eliminate references to the poll taxes once imposed to disenfranchise blacks.


b. Kerry against Chavez: http://counterpunch.org/lahey10152004.html

c. The Fascist Democrats of Northern California: http://counterpunch.org/anderson10302004.html

d. A review of how evil the USA Democratic Party can be - but a flawed analysis of progressive hopes - Turning Up the Heat on Bush, by Robert L. Borosage
http://www.thenation.com/doc.mhtml?i=20050131&s=borosage

e. Bush and Kerry the Same on Palestine: http://counterpunch.org/assad10082004.html

f. Alexander Cockburn - Surrendering : http://www.newleftreview.net/NLR26301.shtml

g. The Cult of Clinton: http://counterpunch.org/scaramella11112004.html


Note V. :

See polls on USA citizen ignorance on geography, War in Iraq and pretty much anything you can think of. Examine USA drug abuse (legal and illegal), prisoner abuse, obesity, psychological breakdowns and John Zerzan.

For a look at the delusions and voids in the USA-dominated anti-globalization movement see:
Naomi Klein - Ray Smith (November 25, 2004) (she bashes John Kerry, but doesn't grasp the problems of CAPITALISM! ,

http://NAomi Klein is Fearfulwww.marxist.com/Globalisation/klein_meeting_london.htm


Note VI. :

Speech by Hugo Chavez:

http://www.venezuelanalysis.com/docs.php?dno=1011

Today, vis-?-vis the obvious failure of neoliberalism and the great threat that the International Economic Order represents for our countries, it is necessary to retake the Spirit of the South. That is where this Summit in Caracas is heading for. I propose to re-launch the G-15 as a South Integration Movement rather than a group. A movement for the promotion of all possible trends, who walks towards the Non-aligned Movement, the Group of 77, China... The entirely whole South!! I propose that we retake the proposals of the 1990 South Commission:



Note VII. :



See: PART II.
Tsunamis Inside the Criticisms of the Left: Venezuela versus the Shams of the World,


or The Nation, Jan. 3, 2005,
Mark Hertsgaard see:

http://www.markhertsgaard.com/Articles/2004/EnviroChallenge/



Note VIII.:

a. Andes Circle Aid Projects - www.andescircle.faces.com

(click on My First Blog)

b. The only exceptions to "All Funding to the Andes" might be legal aid to activists under prosecution (persecution) and prison support to incarcerated activists and other direct victims of Police State terrorism.



Note IX.:

If everyone in the USA gave on average one percent of their income to building a real resistance, the sum would equal 11 billion dollars a year. If 10 percent of the USA gave five percent of their income the sum would be 55 billion dollars or if five percent of the people gave 10 percent of their income it would equal 55 billion dollars. The government budgets of several Latin American governments are: Venezuela ($24 billion), Bolivia ($3 billion), Ecuador ($7 billion) and Peru ($12 billion) total of these 4 countries is 46 billion.



Note X.:

-- Chalmers Johnson;

http://www.inmotionmagazine.com/global/cj_int/cj_int2.html


Or any article from James Petras

(Espanol Rebelion www.rebelion.org)


NOTE XI.

Read about the thousands of volunteers who joined the Sandinista Revolution in Nicaragua from 1978 to 1990. We were there - it was unbelievable and far surpassed everything that has developed in Chiapas, Mexico, Zapatista land.


M..E..R..

Write:

MER Email: Mescuelas_revolt@yahoo.com



CONNECT*NG

Power: strength that comes- mastery of fear. True for society as much as a person. This path is found in the clarity of thought and purpose.

- Jason Martin


Free download of the film "Venezuela Bolivariana: People and Struggle of the Fourth World War", a documentary about the Bolivarian Revolution of Venezuela and its links to the world-wide movement against capitalist globalization.

Here in 7 downloadable segments is the film "Venezuela Bolivariana: People and Struggle of the Fourth World War", by Marcelo Andrade and the Calle Y Media Collective. 76 min., 2004, Spanish with English subtitles.

This documentary examines the Bolivarian Revolution of Venezuela and its links to the world-wide movement against capitalist globalization. The film shows the evolution of the popular movement in Venezuela from the "Caracazo" riots of 1989 to the massive actions that brought revolutionary president Hugo Chavez back to power, 48 hours after a U.S.-led military coup in 2002.

The main theme is how the Bolivarian Revolution, thanks to its incredible grassroots and networking power, is a revolution that transcends the national frontiers of Venezuela and contributes with concrete alternatives to the fight against neoliberal capitalism.

Calle Y Media Collective: http://www.calleymedia.org

------------------

Part 1: http://images.indymedia.org/imc/prico/venboliv_part1.mp4
Part 2: http://images.indymedia.org/imc/prico/venboliv_part2.mp4
Part 3: http://images.indymedia.org/imc/prico/venboliv_part3.mp4
Part 4: http://images.indymedia.org/imc/prico/venboliv_part4.mp4
Part 5: http://images.indymedia.org/imc/prico/venboliv_part5.mp4
Part 6: http://images.indymedia.org/imc/prico/venboliv_part6.mp4
Part 7: http://images.indymedia.org/imc/prico/venboliv_part7.mp4
http://www.calleymedia.org/

Posted by mer130 at 12:56 AM EST
Updated: Thursday, 24 February 2005 3:55 PM EST
Wednesday, 19 January 2005
Criteria for Decisions Tech and Policies
Topic: MER Economics



Criteria to ask about any Technology, product, policy

I. Version for Technology

Ecological

What are its effects on the health of the planet and of the person?
Does, it preserve or destroy biodiversity and ecosystem integrity?
What are its effects on the land? On wildlife?
How much and what kind of waste does it generate?
Does it incorporate the principles of ecological design?
Does it preserve or reduce cultural diversity?
What is the totality of its effects, its "ecology"?

Ethical

How complicated is it?
What percentage of people now understand its operations and uses?
What does it allow us to ignore?
To what extent does it distance agent from effect?
Can we assume personal, or communal, responsibility for its effects?
Can its effects be directly apprehended?
What ancillary technologies does it require?
What behavior might it make possible in the future?
What other technologies might it make possible?


Solidarity

Does it serve community?
Does it empower community members?
How does it affect our perception of our needs?
Is it consistent with the-creation of a communal, human economy?
What are its effects on relationships?
Does it undermine traditional forms of community?
How does it affect our way of seeing and experiencing the world?
Does it foster a diversity of forms of knowledge?
Does it build on, or contribute to, the renewal of traditional forms of knowledge?
Does it serve to commodity knowledge or relationships?
To what extent does it redefine reality?
Does it erase a sense of time and history?
What is its potential to become addictive?
Moral
What values does its use foster?
What is gained by its use?
What are its effects beyond its utility to the individual?
What is lost in using it?
What are its effects on the least person in the society?


Aesthetic


Does it cause ugliness?
What noise does it make?
What pace does it set?
How does it affect quality of life (as distinct from standard of living/GDP)
Vocational
What is its impact on craft?
Does it reduce, deaden, or enhance human creativity?
Is it the least imposing technology available for the task?
Does it replace, or does it aid, human hands and human beings?
Does it depress or enhance the quality of goods?
Does it depress or enhance the meaning of work?


Political

What is its mystique?
Does it concentrate or equalize power?
Does it require, or institute, a knowledge elite?
Is it totalitarian?
Does it require a bureaucracy for its perpetuation?
What legal empowerments does it require?
Does it undermine traditional moral authority?
Does it require military defense?
Does it enhance, or serve, military purposes?
Does it foster mass thinking or behavior?
Does it empower transnational corporations?
What kind of capital does it require?

Practical

What does it make?
Who does it benefit?
What is its purpose?
Where was it produced?
Where is it used?
Where must it go when it's broken or obsolete?
Can it be repaired by an ordinary person?
What is the entirety of its cost, the full cost accounting?


Metaphysical


What aspect of the inner self does it reflect?
Does it express love?
Does it express rage?
What aspect of our past does it reflect?
Does it reflect cyclical or linear thinking?


Version for Policies


Ecological


What are its effects on the health of the local and regional planet and persons?
Does, it preserve or destroy biodiversity, ecosystem integrity and long run yields or output?
How much and what kind of waste does it generate and where will they be disposed of?
Does it incorporate the principles of ecological design and localization economics?
Does it preserve or reduce cultural diversity?
What is the totality of its effects, its "ecology"?


Ethical


How complicated is it?
What percentage of people now understand how the policy would operate ?
What does it allow us to ignore?
To what extent does it distance agent from effect?
Can we assume personal, or communal, responsibility for its effects?
What technologies does it require?
What behavior might it make possible in the future?
How does it affect other policies?


Community


Does it serve community?
Does it empower community members?
How does it affect our perception of our needs?
Is it consistent with the-creation of a communal, human economy?
What are its effects on relationships?
Does it undermine traditional forms of community?
How does it affect our way of seeing and experiencing the world?
Does it foster a diversity of forms of knowledge?
Does it build on, or contribute to, the renewal of traditional forms of knowledge?
Does it serve to commodity knowledge or relationships?
To what extent does it redefine reality?
Does it erase a sense of time and history?


Moral


What values does its use foster?
What is gained by its use?
What are its effects beyond its utility to the individual?
What is lost in using it?
What are its effects on the least person in the society?


Aesthetic


What noise does it make?
What pace does it set?
How does it affect quality of life (as distinct from standard of living).

Vocational

What is its impact on craft?
Does it reduce, deaden, or enhance human creativity?
Is it the best policy approach available for the task? Is the task really important?
Does it replace, or does it aid, human hands and human beings?
Does it depress or enhance the quality of goods?
Does it depress or enhance the meaning of work?


Political


What is its mystique?
Does it concentrate or equalize power?
Does it require, or institute, a knowledge elite?
Does it require a bureaucracy for its perpetuation?
What legal empowerments does it require?
Does it undermine traditional moral authority?
Does it require military defense? or serve, military purposes?
Does it foster mass thinking or behavior?
Does it empower transnational corporations?
What kind of capital does it require?

Practical


What does it make?
Who does it benefit? What is its purpose?
Where was it produced? Where is it used?
What is the entirety of its cost, the full cost accounting?

Metaphysical


What aspect of the inner self does it reflect?
Does it express love? Does it express rage?
What aspect of our past does it reflect?
Does it reflect cyclical or linear thinking?
Version for Products ( And Programs)



Posted by mer130 at 2:41 PM EST
MER EConomic Adaptation of Solidarity Economics
Topic: MER Economics
Solidarity and An Agrarian-Based New Economics
Solidarity Economics


The key policy areas that a new system or economic order naturally embraces:


A Comprehensive National Education Program for A Solidarity Society that Prioritizes:

Women & Children; Dignity for the Indigenous & All Workers;
Health for All Including the Environment;
& a Participatory Economics of the Local: Land and Liberty.


December 28, 2004 ;
Adapted by Mundo de Escuelas Revolucionarias

Research Team: Jason Martin, Marta Miranda y Enrique Munoz


Focusing Priority on a Future for All:

Solidarity and An Agrarian-Based New Economics:
The Social Economy: Macro and Micro Policies; ISE and Eco-Social Indicator Indexes

Contact: Enrique Munoz : MEscuelas_Revolt@yahoo.com

Mundo de Escuelas Revolucionarias - MER

MER Does the Following: Educate Through: Educational curriculum, Writings, Workshops and Films the Policies that Are Changing the World in Cuba, Venezuela, Brazil, Peru, Bolivia, Colombia and Everywhere that People Fight Capitalism and the US-EU Empire to Build a People-Centered Solidarity Society that Prioritizes Women and Children; Revolutionary Education; Dignity for the Indigenous and Workers; Pure Food; Heath for All Including the Environment; and an Economics of Agrarian-Based Community-Owned Worker-Managed Market Socialism


Abstract

Solidarity Economics informs researchers about the trends in thinking and applied policies in Latin America for moving to a post-neoliberal world - a new economics. Part I considers the problems of the world: The dominance of US-EU corporations and the growing power of these capitalist entities in international trade, public opinion formation and politics; the problems of poverty, urban slums, environmental destruction; and finally, how the infighting and underdevelopment of the opposition to the capitalist-corporate Empire-building is threatening the possibility of change. Working definitions of concepts used in economics (Import Substitution, Public Goods and Bads, Basic Needs Goods and Community-Labor Managed Market Socialism) are presented and the solutions proposed by a Solidarity Economics are examined. An outline of Solidarity Economics is set forth and compared to similar social and economic policies of the past and present (in Venezuela and Brazil). A section is devoted to ideas on extending Solidarity Economics and where it leads.

Commandante marcos and the General Command of the EZLN say:
- The difference between them (US corporate militarists) and all of us is in the heart. We have a tomorrow in our hearts... they have only a past they wish to repeat over and over again. We are fighting for humanity, they fight for neo-liberal free trade. All of this has to do with a war, one which feeds on blood and excretes dollars... the global butcher shop of globalization."

_ M.E.R. would only say: The difference between the Zapatistas and real revolutionaries (the Radical Restructurists) is that we have a plan and we have poems too.


(1) Part I: Solidarity Economics:
Solidarity and An Agrarian-Based New Economics


Against the US-Driven Economics of the Suicidal

I. Questions of the Broader Context of the Global Struggle Against Capitalism and Empire:

Are we trying to change the whole world so that a greener and truly compassionate new lifestyle for Earth is possible - The Long Run Goal?

Are we trying to organize politically, spiritually and through regional rebellions (Venezuela, Cuba, Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Peru, Chiapas, Iraq, Nepal ...India) against the US-EU Empire so that we can fight their dead-end and violent mindset - The Short Run Strategy?

Are these goals and strategies the same thing? Can civil society at all levels grasp the appropriate balance of these struggles in time to stop the momentum of the rich countries?

Is there a meeting of the minds between the three tendencies of the Global Resistance Struggle: Third World Revolutionaries (FARC-EP/ELN-Colombia; Peruvian Revolutionary Movements; Nepalese Maoists); Radical Restructurists: (Walden Bello; Cuba; Via Campesina; MST-Brazil; Movimiento Quinta Republica (MVR); Sandinista policies before 1990; Bolivian Miners and Highland Indigenous Rebels) and the third tendency: the mixture of moderate reformers and Resistance as Carnival types who imagine that one can "Change the World without-Taking-the-Power (2)" (Zapatistas, Green-Block, US-Anarchists; Eco-Villages; Argentine Autonomists, some Chavez advisors and many US-EU anti-globalization and anti-Iraq War protestors)?

Representative of the latter group is a German Green Communist of the Zapatismo persuasion who said at the WTO protests in Cancun, Mexico (2003): "We don't need to define the Carnival or its economics - it will all be different in each country, explaining it destroys it and people won't accept that.

Walden Bello:

"We must not only know what we are against, but also what we are for... When legitimacy or consensus goes, it may only be a matter of time before the structures themselves [Capitalism] begin to unravel... this crisis does not necessarily result in a more benign system of international relations... the outcome may be "barbarism." Which is why the articulation of an alternative order is critical,,, a vision centered on a participatory process to build the institutions that would again subordinate the market to society, promote genuine equity between genders and color lines and within and among countries and establish a benign relationship between human community and the biosphere. [This] remains the great challenge... our future."(3)


Many people believe that moderate reforms - tinkering with the system - can change the system in time to avoid a meltdown. Many people have given up on change or believe that only extreme or violent change will succeed. These views play into the hands of the system. Many people fear that radical restructuring is not enough or is not possible. Moderate reformers have tried their way for 30 years and achieved nothing positive or tangible. The revolutionaries and Carnival of Resistance people need to understand that the plan of the Radical Restructurists is both wise (what will end up happening - even after a revolution) and clever (recruits more people than revolutionary propaganda alone).


The key policy areas that a new system or economic order naturally embraces:


A Comprehensive National Education Program for A Solidarity Society that Prioritizes:
Women and Children; Dignity for the Indigenous and All Workers;
Health for All Including the Environment;
and a Participatory Economics of the Local: Land and Liberty.


II. Problems of the World: Capitalism and Materialism


The capitalist system is based on a competitive struggle to exploit people and nature for private profits and growth. We reject this system because it creates a dynamic of endless growth that is ecologically suicidal and breeds greed and domination in society. (GPUSA National Green Program; www.greenparty.org/program/econdemoc.html)

People are dying in Mexico, Venezuela, Bolivia...Afghanistan...Colombia...Palestine... because of Savage Capitalism and the battles to overthrow corrupt governments. But some of the chaos around the world stems from the problems of the vision-conflict and the leadership vacuum that are rampant among the left and the green alternative. This new kind of autonomist-environmentally sustainable-market socialism has not been able or willing to define itself. The failure to endorse a practical program threatens to weaken the radical coalitions in the anti-US and anti-WTO Globalization movements. Revolutionary projects in Latin American countries are held back by the lack of clarity over economic programs, goals and the sacrifices required to achieve these goals. In Bolivia's case the lack of leadership or plan keeps the civil war simmering and unresolved.(4)


Something is wrong with global civil society. The US-EU Empire machine is humming along conquering, killing or intimidating vast areas of the globe. The main weakness of the US is that it cannot sustain itself economically without global control. The hidden hand of US power - the hand that compliments its Imperialist armed forces is the WTO and other trade agreements. If civil society would agree on a new economics and hold strikes and protests similar to those done before the US invasion of Iraq, then a new world would be born. In Cancun, Mexico (2003) the US and its supporters in Europe failed to consolidate their neo-colonial economic plan: the WTO. At the Miami FTAA the US tried to consolidate the "free trade" economic structure it needs for the Western Hemisphere, but resistance from Brazil resulted in a watered-down agreement to keep negotiations open.(5) The euphoria over marginally successful protests does nothing to alter the current program of globalization and corporate business as usual. Temporary defeats do not threaten the momentum of the US economic juggernaut.


Millions of people are dying because the socio-economic alternative to the capitalist system is vague and ill-defined.


Despite the heroic struggle of the MST landless workers movement, the World Social Forums and the work of numerous localization and agro-ecological proponents, there is still no global plan for an alternative to US domination. Without the unity of social movements and a vision that ties them together, corporate globalization will proceed unchecked. The prosperity of globalization is limited to a tiny percent of the world's people, it was founded upon the oppressive labor of poor people all over the world; and its ecological costs increasingly threatened all life, including the lives of the supposedly prosperous... An economy based on waste is inherently and hopelessly violent, and war is its inevitable by-product.


III. Economics of the System


"If the craze for machinery methods continues, it is highly likely that a time will come when we shall be so incapacitated and weak that we shall begin to curse ourselves for having forgotten the use of the living machines given to us by God... A certain degree of physical comfort is necessary but above a certain level it becomes a hindrance instead of help; therefore the ideal of creating an unlimited number of wants and satisfying them, seems to be a delusion and a trap... Europeans will have to remodel their outlook if they are not to perish under the weight of the comforts to which they are becoming slaves."
Gandhi (http://www.squat.net/caravan/ICC-en/Krrs-en/ghandi-econ-en.htm).
Gandhi felt that economic violence - poverty - was the worst form of violence. He abhorred passivism (and typewriters!) and felt that if one cannot do non-violence correctly or fully then it is better to do violence than to do nothing (passivism).

There are two paths for the world at this time: a high-tech savage capitalism of mega-cities, starvation and pollution (7) or a transition to an agrarian-based localization through Solidarity Economics. Policy makers want to keep economics a secret so they never allow discussion of the real questions of what kind of country people want to have and what it costs to accomplish this goal. The rich want a world designed to keep them and their viewpoints in control of everything. Politicians refuse to challenge these assumptions and so policies of growth and inequality are built into the system.

The purpose of economic growth is not to make the rich wealthier, it is to fool the poor into thinking that the economic system makes sense and that with hard work and good government they can one day live like people in the US. The truth about the US needs to be told to the people of the world: the majority of the people in the US live in the following conditions: prisons (criminal or retirement home); are wanted by the police or Homeland Security; are criminals or mentally ill; or addicted to a wide range of legal or illegal drugs.(8) The US has convinced its people to work harder and longer than people in other industrialized nations and to accept fewer benefits such as health care and unemployment. This rushed existence creates social problems and leads to the disintegration of families, high rates of violence and a poorly educated populace. Most US citizens are ignorant about politics, economics and geography. Two-thirds of US citizens are obese or overweight!


The structures of US democracy and its citizens' participation are a pitiful joke. Pitiful if they weren't killing so many and threatening the planet... US politicians talk image-polity while the state-corporate media and entertainment nexus avoid any real debate, and even useful analysis or thinking are rare commodities. US-styled materialism, the sanctity of the (rigged) market system and free trade worship are spreading outward from the US where even many of the people fighting the system believe that capitalism is acceptable and that the US Empire can change without falling into chaos.(9) The invisible hand of the market is not the price mechanism where supply and demand intersect, it's composed of the laws, subsidies and regulations that are created by self-serving politicians at the behest of the elite, the rich and the corporations. At the global level, the WTO, like NAFTA and the FTAA, restricts a nation's or a community's ability to pass laws relating to the kind of economy they wish to have. Few people understand the dangers of the WTO: its destruction of local democracy and how it threatens environmental and social protections.


Theoretical models of democracy (including the deformed US-style Democratic Republics) and the models of economic market theory are based on the ideas that voters or consumers have perfect information about their choices and the associated prices. However, most people have almost no information and the complexity of the world (and its markets) makes a mockery of notions of citizen participation and democratic decision-making. This is part of the reason why people all over the world and especially in Latin America are rejecting the entire concept of liberal democracy.(10)Cardinal Oscar Rodriguez, the Archbishop of Tegucigalpa, Honduras called for a "globalisation of solidarity" to counter the excesses of "savage" market liberalisation that has benefited the rich over the poor. The Cardinal argued that the welfare state had been dismantled, and replaced by an "absolutism of capitalism...The world is becoming globalised to the rhythm of the major economic powers. Economic globalisation without the globalisation of solidarity is suicide for the poor and thus for the majority of humanity." http://www.cafod.org.uk/events/popepaullecture2003report.shtmlI



IV. Killing the Teachers: Behind Economics is US Foreign Policy

Royalty, advertisements, business people, academic experts, corporate media newscasters, school text books and the crudely elected elite have been shaping the meaning of economics and keeping people from believing in alternatives for decades. From Nicaragua to Brazil and Korea, the US intervenes as it chooses. It's not the military or the marginal economic threats that the US fears, it's these countries' pursuit of alternative economic programs controlled by the people or their vanguards. Experiments and new ideas scare the elite more than weapons of mass destruction. The US flexes its military muscles - to kill the teachers - to keep the world safe for corporate capitalism and to keep debate or any living examples of alternative structures from taking root. The US military apparatus has a market value beyond its annual $500 billion budget, a sum greater than the annual incomes of the poorest two billion people in the world.(11) The US is a business organization like the Mafia or a drug cartel. Their business slogan is crafted for its persuasive bluntness: Pay tribute, give us the keys to your economy, your investments and ideas or else we kill you. (ed. Note: Need data on public spending in various Latin American countries and compare totals to the US Pentagon $500 billion figure).

The US and UK have created a global casino (or Enron) economy - what David Korten terms The Suicide Economy(12) - where the US trades financial services like the privilege of using our banks and stock markets for 100s of billions of dollars in imported coffee, cars, computers, sugar, cut flowers and steel. The US doesn't have to produce much except weapons in order to create a safe haven for investors and thus earn billions of dollars from bank transfers and stockbroker's fees. Another global subsidy to the US is the US dollar that enjoys unusual strength due to its widespread use as the benchmark currency for petroleum and other goods. An artificially strong dollar allows the US to get away with huge trade deficits that would normally result in high interest rates and economic problems. The dollar is expected to fall another 40% in 2005. The collusion between the US and EU is apparent as the Europeans could supplant the dollar and reap the benefits of being the new reserve currency and yet they decline the opportunity and help keep US hegemony strong and fixed.

To justify the privileged position of the US and show its generosity, foreign aid programs pretend to help the poor while primarily benefiting the foreign elite and US corporations like Monsanto, John Deer, Bechtel, Haliburton, ADM and Cargil.(13) The US gives the least foreign aid of any wealthy country. The US-led OECD nations spend five times more on their farm subsidies than their overseas aid programs. They spend twice as much on these corporate subsidies than the entire value of all poor country farm exports.(14)

If the US or EU wanted to help the poor of the world they could end their agricultural subsidies and their foreign aid programs and just pay poor nation farmers three to four times the current prices of their crops and this would create vibrant economies in many poor countries - and lots of food for the world.


The Conundrum: When the Dead-End is the Only Way

The worst problem in the world is that since Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher the global economic system has been designed so that it cannot be altered without severe repercussions. Since 1980, the US (and to a slightly lesser degree the EU) has become dependent on internal and global growth - fueled by cheap petroleum.(15) No change of any significance is now possible in the US and its people will fight terrible wars to maintain their control of oil and markets. Outside of the US the situation is equally dire as few countries alone or in small groupings dare withdraw from the global trading system (delink) for fear of military or economic retaliation and the resultant backlash of their own people to economic collapse.(16) Grand schemes for improving the sustainability of the planet and the plight of the poor have little chance of ever being implemented. The excellent proposals of the IFG, Walden Bello, and George Monbiot (17) -- like the proposals of Chavez (ALBA) and the proposals presented below -- are only useful once translated into the simple language of a pot-banging clarion call. A revolutionary anti-capitalist uprising against the "suicide economics" of the global elite is breaking out across the globe. It requires a tighter vision.



V. Part I Conclusions


The world economy has entered a monopoly capitalist phase dominated by a US-EU empire and US militarism.(18) Change in the empire is unlikely and the annihilation of alternative experiments by the US coupled with the confusion on the left makes organizing opposition difficult. A crisis of overproduction threatens the capitalist plan and so wars, economic growth and creating consumer markets in China and India are pursued.(19) The continued destruction of the environment is guaranteed. Trade, the WTO, stock market speculation and technologies such as genetically modified plants and animals are the foundations of the empire's plan. Efforts to change the global economy from the top down through the UN or a Fair Trade WTO are unlikely. The only chance for countering these trends is for the three tendencies of the global resistance movement to unify behind a program of radical restructuring based on putting people and communities at the center of a new economics of agrarian-based localization: Solidarity Economics.



(SEE GLOSSARY FOR DEFINITIONS OF KEY TERMS)






VI. PART II: Solidarity Economics: What Kind of
Economy Do We Want ? - What Kind of Economy Can We Have?

"In Venezuela, we are developing a model of struggle against neoliberalism and imperialism.
For this reason, we find that we have millions of friends in this world, although we also have enemies." - Presidente Chavez
(He says that the achievements he is most proud of are the drop in infant mortality, the better nutrition offered in the free breakfast program and not giving in to the rightwing's violent provocation... keeping the "proceso" peaceful.)

We observe that capitalist-oriented market systems are inefficient from moral, social, environmental and sustainability perspectives. Rather than maximize output and then support government bureaucracies and complex legal systems in order to compensate for all the externalities and problems of a growth oriented market system, we propose a new orientation called Solidarity Economics (Also known as Social Economy).(28)

In the Solidarity Economics model the neoliberal fixation on growth and maximizing output are a low priority. Those capitalist goals are replaced with a priority to invent economic policies that provide for the sustainable production of the basics of life: food, housing, education, health and dignity. In the Solidarity model social equity, community self-reliance and sustainability are maximized first. This is accomplished through import substitution at the national then the regional and finally the community level. A nation gradually replaces its imports starting with the easiest first and through education and investment moves up to other goods and services. Simultaneously this program prepares for regional and community import substitution.(29)

Understanding the policies that give direction to a new kind of economics is necessary if the world is to move away from a war on the poor and the ecology. The goal of Solidarity Economics is to increase the availability of basic needs goods and to accomplish this with a declining impact on the environment. This is the world's best hope for security and peace. The real choice that people have is: Do they want a sustainable and just economy that is kind to people and neighbors or do they want to destroy the planet and lose their humanity fighting ugly resource wars? An economic system is only as complex as a people allow it to be. People can have the sustainable economy that they want. It will be different and poorer in many ways than the late 20th Century US economic model. But it will be understandable because it is local, open (transparent) and decided by the people themselves.

Except for the myth of the invisible hand, economics is simple. People will buy a certain amount of a product at a particular price. The invisible hand is supposed to be the price signal that purchasers send to producers through the market. This price signal works for eggs and labor (wages) as well as the purity of water and the experience of art. The problem with markets is that corrupt governments write the laws to benefit the wealthy, the big companies and growth. These are corporate subsidies and state socialism for the rich.(30)

The invisible hand of government policies shapes the production costs and the prices that consumers are willing to pay. If people want a country with many small farms producing organic products then they will be able to employ many people in a labor-intensive program. But people will pay more for food in the short run than they would if they continued to let rich people gobble up farmland and poison it with chemicals, pesticides, herbicides and GMOs. Prices are only lower in the corporate farm system because so many of the externalized costs are not paid by the corporation. These costs include slave labor, child labor, cheap loans, social suffering from the displacement of small farmers, repression of farm workers and impacts on the environment.(31)

Markets and democracy are good things when they work together. A democratic society keeps markets functional and serving human and community needs and security. A democratic government regulates problems caused by imperfect markets. The safest way to do this is to keep all the market players of similar size, knowledge and security. Complex markets or complicated choices for a democracy make it likely that prudence is lost among poor information and the rush of events. The experiments with participatory budgeting in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil (a state of 12 million people) suggest that average people can solve these problems simultaneously. The problems encountered in Brazil also show how difficult any program is when the government has to pay half its budget to foreign bankers for debts caused by previous corrupt governments.(32)


Instead of a profit maximizing and export-based decision-making criteria Solidarity Economics would create a long-run soil conserving and biologically diverse system of farming where inputs - especially imported inputs - were not needed and expensive machinery would be replaced with labor, local resources and ingenuity.


VII. Agrarian-Based Localization: The Four Directions of Priority

Prioritizing the four or five key basic needs of any society, results in an eventual transformation of a society. A new type of economic structure is then born along the lines of a green local-socialist decentralization program.
People should organize and reprioritize state and local policies for: women and children; education for a Solidarity Society of pure food, dignity for indigenous people and all workers; and health for all including the environment. Any country or region that seeks to provide these basic needs in a sustainable way will have little additional funds to waste on militaries and corporate subsidies. In parts of Latin American one can see a new world being born. It's a world where people create the space and freedom to be themselves and care for themselves and their families. New economic structures can accomplish this in ways that build thriving, sustainable communities.

The sciences of Agro-Ecology and Watershed Management can guide localization planning with prioritization for sustainability and equity. With common sense, lessons learned from the past and citizen empowerment through participation, all aspects of this world will evolve differently than the chaotic and cruel dictates experienced when international capital and the powerful elite forced rapid change and modernization on every corner of the planet.

A Structure for Solidarity, Local Power and Sustainable Economics
Solidarity Economics argues for a bias toward rural areas and a policy structure of localization where local resources are used sustainably to produce most of the basic needs goods and a surplus for trade with its nearest neighbors first This structure solves the problems of bureaucracies, political conflict and concentration of wealth. Markets are used locally, but trade is regulated beyond regions through toll roads and high fuel taxes. Toxic chemicals, genetically altered organisms (GMOs) and the weapons trade would be banned. Combined with ecological guidelines and additional restrictions on trade and land ownership, the market would create economic conditions that support small, medium and cooperative-based farms and rural enterprises.(33)The importance of political democracy beyond a locality will eventually decline because most of the decisions over public policy are set in a well-biased (science-based) constitution or made locally.


Agrarian Reform: The Unfinished Revolution

Agriculture and photosynthesis are important renewable resource of most countries. Even poorly endowed places must take advantage of whatever will grow. Trees and riparian areas protect the water and biological resources (biodiversity). Some food, fish or export crops are necessary output from all places. Protecting renewable resources like the soils, forests, estuaries and fisheries is a duty and the basis of natural wealth.

The "Who owns the good farmlands" determines the wealth distribution of a region. The "What is farmed" determines the food dependency/food sovereignty of a place. The "Where" of farming determines the impacts on the ecology and the longrun productivity of the country. Overproduction near rivers or steep hills has a potentially large impact. Light grazing rotations and tree crops would be chosen by a community if it exercised control over the use of its resources. The "Why of farming" determines the importance of culture, respect, sustainability and the connections of the people to the land and the ecology that they live in and depend on. The "How" of farming is connected to and grows out of all of these factors. Investments and trade polices accelerate or control trends in production and growth and thus affect all aspects of rural life and the well-being of the whole country. For decades investments in Latin America have been capital intensive thus creating greater unemployment and a rural exodus to mega-city slums.(34)

Government commissions and scientific research panels (drawn from local and regional experts, students and faculty) will draw up detailed lists of each region's resources: grazing lands, farmlands (in several categories of richness and environmental sensitivity), damaged lands, forests, special wildlands or habit zones, erosion zones, fishing zones and tourist or recreation areas. After these studies are completed lands would be redistributed for free to competent farmers and ranchers. Compensation for seized lands will not be possible in most places because of a lack of funds and the revolutionary perceptions that will accompany these drastic changes. Current owners of land could retain twice the standard limit that is set locally for a particular land type (typically 5 to 10 hectares for the highest quality lands and 20-40 hectares for marginal or grazing lands). Adults over 21 can only own the land that they live on and their vehicle license plate must be from that parcel's address.(35)

Initially land is redistributed to three sectors: small holders, coops and locally owned lands held for distribution to newcomers and population growth. Next the government would analyze imports and exports at national and regional levels. A plan or recommendation is drawn up that considers priority for basic needs goods and the national and regional production advantages: resources, skills, interests and existing complimentary infrastructure. From this point in the process the popular assemblies and research panels devise the final plans for land use, investments and subsidies.


VIII. Ideas for Local Solidarity Projects and Import Substitution with Value Adding

Millions of people in Brazil have poor housing and tens of millions more throughout Latin America are without roofs - Sin Techos. In Buenos Aires, Argentina the piqueteros and asembleas have formed voluntary roofing collectives to repair old houses. They have also set up thrift stores to clothe the poor and the penniless; bakeries to feed the hungry and schools for children and adults where people can also learn about imperialism and the socialist solutions to capitalism's crimes. Market gardens; sewer and water repair cooperatives; community-based TV and radio facilities; clothing manufacture and repairs; barter networks; and food processing are examples of local enterprises that governments and communities should subsidize. In remote areas or in nations lacking petroleum, a program for bio-diesel derived from African Palm plantations could be a beneficial enterprise for collectives and communities.

In a livestock industry keep as much as possible of the leather industry, the by-products (bonemeal, bloodmeal, manure, tallow), fencing material production, dairy, feedstocks, agricultural extension, veterinary services and training and livestock breeding in the community and certainly in the region. This builds local links to a variety of businesses, small and large, and guides education programs (University and Secondary) to create diverse skills in the region. Other examples are micro-credit small business development lending and advice for import substitution enterprises (Grameen Banks); soya farming with seed production, storage, experiments, exports, processing (tofu-feed-soy milk) or direct conversion to animal products (meat and egg industries). And all of these activities would be kept in the hands of local or regional businesses.

As an economy shifts from one based on mega-city pollution, trade and travel to one based on making the best use of local resources and ingenuity, many factories will close and new employment strategies must be devised. Improved rural development schemes will eventually draw workers out of the cities. In the transition period the government and entrepreneurs should focus on policies and businesses that recycle and reuse existing buildings and machinery in urban areas. Recycling and modification of existing equipment for export or use in rural areas requires low investment capital and compliments the overall localization program. Food processing, light manufacturing (farm and building material supplies) and value-added export enterprises are also possible employment and income-generating activities.

If countries fail to institute currency (capital) controls on foreign currency exchange, then debt defaults and capital flight will bankrupt or gut many enterprises. Abandoned or defunct enterprises should be turned over to the workers. Argentina has shown the ability of workers to self-manage production with volunteer assistance from academics and professionals. In Venezuela the government is introducing legislation to allow worker cooperatives to operate businesses that were abandoned by the leaders of the 2002 coup attempt or that went bankrupt from the boss's strike that shut down the oil industry and caused a severe economic contraction. Many urban areas around the world may eventually become giant open-air bazaars (mercados) of reusable and remanufactured goods and materials.(36)


BANKS: OWNED AND MANAGED BY LOCAL COMMUNITIES (See footnotes on banking and credit section MER)

All pension funds, insurance policies, credit and banking would be done through public institutions and audited by an elected regional Board of Supervisors.(37) Only local lending would be allowed and it must meet community prioritization guidelines. Banks are to serve long-term needs and emergencies not to make money at the highest return. With currency controls in place that limit the amount of withdrawals and how much cash can be taken out of the country, the rich would be forced to invest or put their money in the local banks. Forcing businesses to apply for foreign currency use has been effective in Venezuela at identifying businesses and individuals that have not paid taxes which is a huge problem throughout Latin America and most poor countries.(38) Tax avoidance and illegal businesses would have a difficult time if banks were small, local, public and well-audited. To combat inflation and avoid some corruption possibilities banks will maintain a 90 percent reserve requirement on most deposits. Audits will be open to the public and independent audits will be done every other year before the elections of the Board of Supervisors. When a crisis deepens or a new government comes to power, banks should be nationalized with strict currency controls. Reserves and deposit withdrawals are prioritized for key imports and the lower classes. Gradually the banks would be turned over to the communities.

A financial system allocates society's savings to the priorities and the projects chosen by the councils and through local referendums. These banks facilitate day-to-day transactions for cooperatives, individuals and government enterprises. High standards will enhance the public view of safety and admiration for the effects of the lending of their savings. Locally-owned community banks with full-disclosure and frequent audits can. Participants in the capital markets rely heavily on the banking system for their financing facilities. Banks cannot play an effective role in the financial intermediation process unless the public has the utmost confidence in the banking system. This confidence is a key reason why banking institutions and banking instruments are crucial to a country's economic growth and development. The combination of functions typically provided by commercial banks, however, also carries with it the risk that a loss of confidence in an individual institution can spread to the system as a whole, the so-called systemic risk phenomenon. Instances in which a country experiences a loss of confidence in its financial institutions usually result in major damage to the economy. Given the indispensable role that financial institutions play in the success of a country's economy, governments clearly have a responsibility to subject financial institutions to some form of regulation or oversight.

Restrictions placed on banks by the financial oversight apparatus should allow a percentage of risky loans to small enterprises and promising ideas that increase sustainablity or efficiency. Because of the importance and the difficulties inherent in the balancing act, banking systems are subject to a higher degree of official oversight and regulation than are most other forms of private enterprise; and banks are supported by government guarantees.

They generally include oversight of the affairs of banking institutions in the form of inspection and examination of the institutions for compliance with a broad set of safety and soundness standards; some type of protection against losses for small depositors and investors; and some form of emergency liquidity facility for banking institutions and, occasionally, for other financial institutions as well. Finally, the payments system, a crucial link in any financial system, generally includes some form of official regulation of or participation in its operations.The central bank usually plays a major role in the operation of one or more of these facets of the safety net. For example, the emergency liquidity facility is almost always the discount window of the central bank. In many countries--including Ireland and the United States--the central bank also plays an important role in the supervision of banking institutions and in the oversight of payments system operations.

Banks help build and maintain confidence in the underlying stability of the financial system. Achieving and maintaining public confidence depends first and foremost on the success of banks in discharging monetary policy responsibilities. A sound economy and sound money are virtually synonymous, which is why monetary policy stands at the center of central bank functions.

The central bank should not be directly responsible for financing government budget deficits.. Note, however, that even without any involvement in direct financing of government budget deficits, central banks have a major stake in the development and maintenance of a smoothly-functioning government securities market, which can provide substantial benefits to the economy beyond those emanating from private sector financing of government budget deficits. No central bank can maintain price stability over the longer term without public support for the necessary policies. Only with the confidence of the public in their policies and their own lasting dedication to non-inflationary growth together with a well-functioning financial system can central banks succeed in achieving and maintaining price and financial stability.


IX. The Examples of the MST: The Landless Rural Workers of Brazil
The following proposals and on-going projects of the MST are remarkable in their breadth and vision. They have accomplished these feats with little money or skills and in the face of open hostility from the government and the rural elite. When a Brazilian government gets behind the program of the MST then truly - miracles will happen all over Brazil from its soils and its 180 million people. The MST offers the rural poor an alternative, ensuring their welfare and participation in economic development and democracy. The MST is providing healthcare and education to a 100,000 landless families. The MST's National Confederation of Brazilian Land Reform Cooperatives is providing agricultural extension services. They assist in organizing production and facilitate marketing the surplus produce of the MST's settlements. This has transformed land occupations into productive agricultural cooperatives providing ample food, cash income and basic services for many thousands of member families. Moreover, this social movement has created small industries among the most advanced cooperatives, including a clothing factory in Rio Grande do Sul, a tea processing plant in Parana, and a diary processing operation in Santa Catarina. Much of the following is extracted from the US MST website at: www.mstbrazil.org (for the official Portuguese site see: www.mst.org.br)


The Model We Propose: The implementation of the elite's agrarian model will bear enormous consequences, with the marginalisation of small farmers, the impracticality of agrarian reform, and the increased rural exodus. There will also be grave social consequences for the urban population. Let us, then, present some alternatives... a popular project for agriculture: one that resolves the grave social problems that exist in the countryside and equally affect the cities.
1. Agrarian reform - the democratisation of landed property under the disappropriation of all unproductive estates and the massive and hasty distribution to the five million or so, landless families. Organising agrarian reform settlements in such a way to guarantee income and a permanent improvement in living standards.
2. Food Security -- the development of agriculture aimed towards the internal market, aiming to guarantee the provision of high quality food to all Brazilians.
3. Strengthening of Family Agriculture- the implementation of agricultural policies especially those concerning of prices, subsidised rural credits and agricultural security which are capable of ensuring the increased income and productivity of the one million family farms.
4. Cooperatives and agro-industries - promote agro-industrial co-operatives in order to democratise access to the market and create conditions to improve farmers' income.
5. Living Standards - valuing the rural milieu and its way of life and culture, guaranteeing all inhabitants an improved standard of living, better housing, transport, leisure and communication
6. Employment - stimulate the rural employment, both in agricultural and non-agricultural activities. In addition, to guarantee the fundamental socio-economic rights of all those who wish to work as wageworkers.
7. Education -- to guarantee access to primary education to all rural dwellers, improving the curriculum and the necessary conditions in schools, valuing, equally, the teachers and all educational activities. Create opportunities so that children, young people and adults, are all able to study.
8. Environment -- develop policies to protect the environment and our natural resources, in such a manner that is conducive with farm production, promoting the rational use of both solar and hydroelectric power.
9. Semi-arid Areas -- implementation of a special development plan for the semi-arid Northeast, by combating drought and seeking a permanent improvement in living standards in that region.
10. The Agricultural Public Sector -- restore and reorganise the organs that make up the agricultural public sector (INATER, INBRAPA, CONAB, INCRA amongst others) rendering them at the service of the small-scale producers, and of the aforementioned agricultural development plan.
11. A New Technological Model -- implement research and stimulate agricultural technology which is compatible with our soil conditions, climate and national resources; seeking an equilibrium between increased productivity and the preservation of the our natural resources and environment.
12. Industrialization of `the Interior' - stimulate the labour-intensive industry, in particular the agro-industries in the provincial municipalities of the hinterland, in order to stimulate socio-economic progress equally in all regions of the nation, whilst creating employment opportunities, above all for the rural youth.

The viability of this model - According to the Federal Government's own statistics, small- and medium-sized properties under 100 hectares are responsible for 80.8% of rural employment, and for the production of over 50% of the nation's total production: 54% of coffee, 79% of beans, 44% of corn, 45% of wheat, 64% of potatoes, 67% of tomatoes, 75% of bananas and 60% of cocoa. Production - We have now in the settlements around 400 associations for production, trading and services. There are also 49 cooperatives for meat, dairy products and agricultural products (CPA), which provide work for 20 thousand associated families; 32 servicing cooperatives, with 11,174 direct associates; two regional cooperatives for trading; and two credit cooperatives, with 6,113 associates. We keep 96 small and medium-sized agroindustries, which process fruits and vegetables, dairy, grains, coffee, meat and sweets. In order to better develop the production areas, MST created SCA - The Settlers Cooperative System, which coordinates the demands coming from the production sector. The SCA is active in the formation of technicians and also in the management of the cooperatives, analyzing the market and looking into the economic viability of the investments that are made.

Schools: Technical Courses at ITERRA-Institute taught in partnership with the Universities of Bras?lia (UnB) and Campinas (UNICAMP); 150 thousand children attend elementary level classes at 1,200 public schools, where 3,800 teachers work; 1,200 MST educators are teaching literacy classes to 25 thousand adults and youths; MST built and equipped 250 day care centers, called Cirandas Infantis; Training Courses for Educators: Teacher training (magist?rio): Course at the Instituto T?cnico de Capacita??o e Pesquisa da Reforma Agr?ria (ITERRA, in partnership with the State University of Mato Grosso do Sul and partnership with the Federal University of Esp?rito Santo. Women and the Gender Issues: The Brazilian countryside is male-centered as a reflection of society as a whole. Today we have 10 women at our highest leadership level, among a total of 22. In the State of Pernambuco, 5 women preside over cooperatives. In S?o Paulo, a woman presides on the State Central of Cooperatives of the Settled. Small investments agreed upon in the cooperatives and in the associations, go to the betterment of life conditions ("inside the house"), where the woman decides: electricity, laundries, dining commons, day care centers.

Communication: MST produces the newspaper: Jornal Sem Terra and 5 radio shows in the encampments and settlements. They broadcast news and announcements from the point of view of the struggle of our people for justice and peace for all. Websites: the MST's main website is found at www.mst.org.br. (In the USA, Friends of the MST can be found at www.mstbrazil.org.) Culture: We have hundreds of poets, musicians, singers, entertainers, and popular composers. Music, dance, songs and a poetic outlook on life follow us in our demonstrations, our long marches, our peaceful land occupations. Our songs keep famine away and courage alive. Sebasti?o Salgado's Terra exhibit has toured the world. Many Brazilian folk and popular singers contributed to an MST music CD. The songs bring our happy and also our sorrowful moments to life - and they are contagious! ... various well-known Brazilian singers lend their prestige and their enthusiasm.


Human Rights: Motivated by the growing number of murders, beatings, unlawful arrests and even sentencing of landless militants, the movement created its Human Rights Sector... 40 volunteer lawyers are part of it. International Relations: Through CLOC (Latin-American Co-ordination of Peasant Organizations) MST articulates itself among the Campesino Movement, establishing exchanges of experiences, formation and empowerment courses. On the world scenario, the MST participates in Via Campesina, which articulates 90 peasant organizations in 60 countries in the non-violent fight for land, agrarian reform and agrarian policies that are adequate to small family farming and production (as opposed to large cash crops)... we must articulate more and more within the South-South network of relationships, especially with those popular movements who fight for a transformation of the neoliberal system actually engulfing us.

The Environment: We created EMA (Equipe do Meio Ambiente), which is our National Collective on the Environment . It deals with MST policies regarding sustainable organic agriculture; and The Environmental Education Program. Production of BIONATUR agroecological seeds began in September 1999. Various kinds of vegetables, among them onions and carrots, were produced without pesticides or chemical substances of any kind, in a natural and healthy process of agriculture. The seeds are being produced by the COOPERAL Cooperative, in the MST settlement of the municipality of Hulha Negra, in Santa Catarina. In the region known as Pontal do Paranapanema, there is a study going on to preserve the remainder of the local Atlantic Forest, to reforest a large area with native species and generally to practice agriculture respecting the existing ecosystem. MST is also active in: The ecological production of coffee in the State of Esp?rito Santo. The ecological production of rice in the State of Rio Grande do Sul. The preservation of the Forest in the Pontal do Paranapanema (S?o Paulo) and reforestation. The production of medicinal herbs (in various Brazilian States).


X. Examples From Venezuela's Bolivarian Revolution
Health care: The training of health agents; a program for the prevention of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases, supported by the Secretary for Health; and a program called Land and Health, dealing with medicinal plants Venezuela: Examples of Solidarity and Transitional Programs in Action In 1999, President of Venezuela, Hugo Chavez promised homes, health care and education for the poor. Prodded by US interests, the Venezuelan elite responded with treason, sabotage and propaganda. Chavez in the Spirit of the Brazilian MST encouraged the people to respond with their own Power because the struggle for land reform and the rights of the people will only be real when the people assert them. From a desire for modest reforms, Chavez has followed the people into a new world of Local Power, Solidarity Economics and Revolutionary Education.(39) The first program Chavez launched was Plan Bolivar 2000 where all branches of the military devised programs that would benefit the poor. These efforts involved transportation services and projects; repairing refrigerators; organizing cooperatives and giving development and technical courses. Plan Avispa, organized by the National Guard, built homes for the poor. Plan Reviba was similar, except instead of building new homes from scratch, involved rebuilding old homes. Other aspects of Plan Bolivar 2000 involved distributing food to remote areas of the country.

Plan Bolivar 2000 repaired thousands of schools, hospitals, clinics, homes, churches, and parks. Over two million people received medical treatment. Nearly a thousand inexpensive markets were opened, two million children were vaccinated, and thousands of tons of trash were collected, to name just a few of the program's results. Long-term anti-poverty policies started in 2001 with integrated macroeconomic policies for alleviating poverty: reducing inflation, diversifying the economy, and increasing non-oil revenues. 2002 saw the expansion of the urban and the rural land reform programs, the micro-credit programs, increased spending on primary education, and the efforts to promote cooperatives throughout the country.(39)

Rural Land Reform: Because Venezuela has high unemployment and imports much of its food, agriculture is a key import substitution target. Venezuela's rural land reform was introduced in November 2001, as one of the package of 49 laws, which were passed at the same time concerning the state oil industry and other reforms. The law states that all adult Venezuelans have a right to apply for a piece of land for their family. This land is to be taken from state-owned land holdings, which are enormous and make up the largest part of Venezuela's agriculturally viable land. The law opens up the possibility for the state to redistribute privately held land, if it is part of an estate of more than 100 hectares of high quality agricultural land or 5,000 hectares of low quality land. The land would be expropriated at market rates, making Venezuela's land reform a relatively non-radical program. The government distributed little land in 2002 due to the coup attempts. The next year it turned over 1.5 million hectares to about 130,000 families. This comes to an average of 11.5 hectares per family and a total beneficiary population of 650,000 (based on 5 persons per household).

So far no land has been expropriated. There has been conflict over land which the government considers state land, but which large land owners claim to be theirs, even though they lack the documents to prove it. The land reform is a comprehensive program that aims to avoid the typical problems by making sure that the new farmers have the skills, credit, technology, and marketing channels to actually make a living off of their newly acquired land. In addition to the national land institute (INTI), there is an institution that provides credit and skills training and an organization for marketing agricultural products that are produced by beneficiaries of the land reform. In the long-term, the reforms contribute to the diversification of the economy and to assure food sovereignty. In the medium term, the program is aimed at reducing rural poverty and also urban poverty, to the extent that people move out of urban slums and into the countryside. (40)

Urban Land Reform: Another important anti-poverty measure is the urban land reform, which will redistribute the land of the barrios (urban slums) to its inhabitants. Similar to the one Hernando de Soto has promoted in Peru, it incorporates elements that make this program an example for other countries. When people acquire title to their own self-built home in the barrio, they have security for the first time that they will not be expelled. They can use the home as collateral for a small loan, to improve their home, to buy a better home, or to invest in a small business. The process of acquiring urban land titles is a collective process, which brings the neighborhood together in the interest of improving the neighborhood's infrastructure, such as roads, access to utilities, security, comfort, etc. (41)

The collective nature of the process is perhaps the most innovative aspect of the government's urban land program. To acquire titles, 100 to 200 families in a neighborhood have to get together and form a land committee, which then acts as a liaison with the government on regularizing the land ownership of the families that the committee represents. A positive consequence in many cases is that the land committees have begun working on many more issues besides the negotiation and acquisition of land titles. They have also formed sub-committees that deal with public utility companies, such as the water and the electric company. About a third of the barrio land is on government property (another third is on private property and one third on land where ownership is as yet undetermined).

The process is slow because it involves many technical and legal steps. By November 2003, throughout Venezuela, about 45,000 families (befitting 225,000 individuals) had received titles to their homes, with another 65,000 families (or 330,000 individuals) to receive them soon. In February, 2003 Agriculture and Lands (MAT) Minister Efren Andrades announced a series of food production projects for urban areas across the country. A pilot project for two slums in southern Caracas is supported by a UN FAO grant that will also finance near-urban poultry farms.

Micro-Finance and Social Economy: The social economy project of the Chavez government promotes cooperatives and micro-finance. The micro-finance program has several different institutional bases. Banco de la Mujer (Women's Bank), Bandes (Bank for Economic and Social Development, Banfoandes (Bank for the Promotion of the Andean Region), and the Banco del Pueblo (People's Bank) are involved in micro-finance as are institutions such as the Fund for the Development of Micro-Finance and the Ministry of Development of the Social Economy. A banking law requires all conventional banks to dedicate a certain percentage of their loans to micro-finance. Between 2001 and 2003 about $50 million worth of micro-credits have been lent out by the banks named above.

The Women's Bank and the People's Bank have given 70,000 micro-credits between them. In 2004, the government intends to expand the micro-credits program, according to the Minister for the Social Economy, Nelson Merentes.(43) Private and public banks also gave out micro-credits for a total of $75 million during the month of September 2003.(44) Among the important beneficiaries of the micro-credit program are cooperatives. Venezuela had only 800 cooperatives when Chavez came to power, it is now estimated that there are over 40,000. The promotion of cooperatives boosts the small business sector, which is generally known to be the first place new jobs are created in an economy. For a discourse on social economy and solidarity in Venezuela and cooperatives see the interview of Felipe Perez-Marti at http://venezuelanalysis.com/articles.php/articles.php?artno=1019Bolivarian Schools and Daycare Programs By 1996 public spending for education had dropped to 2.1% of GDP.

When the Chavez came to power he increased public spending on education to 4.3% of GDP, twice the level of 1996. Much of the investment went to the building of new schools and the transformation of old ones into "Bolivarian Schools." Bolivarian schools address Venezuela's poverty in a variety of ways: they are day-long schools, thus freeing up both parents from daytime childcare duties; schools provide breakfast, lunch, and an afternoon snack, regular meals that many poor children often did not receive before. As of 2003, 2,800 Bolivarian schools have been opened (half are newly constructed). These schools serve 600,000 children, or 12% of all school-age children.(45) Complementing the Bolivarian schools program is the "Plan Simoncito," which provides free daycare and pre-school education to children from ages 0 to 6. Many households are single parents who have a hard time finding ways to balance parenthood with a job. In 1989, 19,000 infants were in state-supported daycare, they now serve over 300,000. In 1984, 70% of students from poor backgrounds who applied for entrance to the university were admitted, by 1998 only 19% were admitted.(46) For working class students the admission rate dropped from 67% to 27%. As a result, it is estimated that there are over 400,000 Venezuelans who formally fulfill the requirements and would like to attend the university. The Bolivarian University of Venezuela (UBV) is thus supposed to fill the gap. 2,400 students are enrolled in the university, which opened in October 2003. Another 20,000 are pre-registered.(47)

Short-Term Anti-Poverty Measures - The Missions October 2003 President Chavez announced seven different "Missions" for fighting poverty.

The first mission was Mission Robinson, named after Simon "Robinson" Rodriguez, who was Simon Bolivar's teacher. Mission Robinson addresses illiteracy. Venezuela invited hundreds of Cuban literacy experts to come to Venezuela and to train teachers. Over 1 million Venezuelans are benefiting from the program, with the help of over 100,000 literacy teachers, who work throughout the country. Mission Robinson II will teach participants everything they need to reach 6th grade. It will incorporate over 629,000 students for 2003.Mission Ribas is named after independence hero Jos? Felix Ribas, and serves individuals who dropped out of high school. Over 5 million Venezuelans have dropped out of high school. The Minister of Energy and Mines, who is one of the main coordinators of the program, announced in early November that slightly over 700,000 Venezuelans indicated an interest in the program. The program is free. Once students complete their studies, the state-owned oil company PDVSA and the electric company CADAFE will offer to place students in the mining, oil, and energy sector. The whole program is being primarily coordinated by PDVSA and CADAFE, which are also providing most of the funding for the program. For the poor, one of the greatest hindrances to a university education is their lack of financing. Mission Sucre is a scholarship program through which 100,000 poor Venezuelans will receive $100 per month for their university education.

Mission "Barrio Adentro" (Inside the Neighborhood) - Community Health Care To address health problems in the "Barrios," the Chavez government launched a community health program called, "Barrio Adentro." This program, with the help of just over 1,000 Cuban doctors, places small community health clinics in the Barrios, in areas that previously never had doctors nearby. The program was first launched in Caracas and is now being expanded to the rest of the country. After six months of existence, the program had served three million Venezuelans, primarily in the greater Caracas metropolitan area. Maria Urbaneja, the health minister at the time, said that even though there were plenty of unemployed doctors in Venezuela, not enough could be found who were willing to work in the barrios. There is a plan to gradually replace the Cuban doctors with Venezuelan ones.


Mission Miranda
- Military Reservists Venezuela's military has long been a place where people from poor backgrounds can find an education and a place to work. Chavez launched Mission Miranda, named after independence hero, General Francisco de Miranda, to create a military reserve out of people who once served in the military. Participants receive the minimum wage, training in forming cooperatives, and the opportunity to apply for micro-credits. When the program was announced in October 50,000 soldiers had already signed up, with another 50,000 to be added before the end of the year. All of the reservists who signed up are currently unemployed. The opposition questioned the intentions behind Mission Miranda, saying that Chavez is creating a parallel army that would be directly under his personal command. The suspicion is that Chavez would use this armed force to keep himself in power, even if he loses the recall referendum.


Mission Mercal - Food Distribution Mission Mercal is a network for distributing food throughout the country at slightly below market rates at government supported supermarkets. This program emerged as a result of the December 2002 employer sponsored general strike, which shut down food distribution. As of November 2003 there were 100 government markets around the country. The government is accelerating the building of these supermarkets, so that the number will double to 200 in December. The opposition criticizes this program saying that the Mercal markets undermine the private sector. Mercal markets primarily serve areas that are neglected by the private sector. Venezuela's government places emphasis on education: a strategy which takes time to bear fruit. May 2003 marked the beginning of a fourth phase of the Chavez Presidency when the country's oil industry recovered and the rightwing opposition began to fall apart. The government had more resources to implement short-term anti-poverty measures and to refocus on its medium term strategies, placing particular emphasis on land reform and on the Bolivarian University. Conferences are often held in Caracas now as people from all over the world come to see this popular experiment called the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela. Indigenous leaders and agrarian reform students have flocked here and there is planning for a hemisphere-wide school for teaching peasant agriculture and policy studies. Venezuela is well on its way to an Economics of Solidarity.(48)


XI. The Last Step is a Whopper

-

Many economists and poverty activists endorse Solidarity Economics to one degree or another. Venezuela, the Zapatistas, the poor of Argentina, many people in Bolivia and the millions who support the MST landless workers movement in Brazil are moving in the direction of a new kind of society, politics and economy. But few people really understand what that will actually entail. Even if the US and the rich were not hostile, the road would be hard and full of speed bumps. The biggest hurdle that we all must face is to give up on economic growth, to give up on any kind of prosperity that is measured in the old ways. As many of the on-the-farm MST have decided in Brazil: "we want to be simple, to survive with dignity and perfect our subsistence technique and customs."

That is all: a community, a healthy life for the children and enough to eat.(49)

There are gleanings of this perspective in the social economy project of the Chavez government. It is not "just" an anti-poverty measure, but constitutes a central element in Chavez' Bolivarian project. It is designed to alleviate poverty and is also a central aspect for creating a more egalitarian, democratic, and solidaristic society. The government's website defines the social economy as encompassing the following seven elements:(50)

1. The social economy is an alternative economy.

2. Where democratic and self-governing practices dominate.

3. It is driven by forms of work based on partnership and not on wage-earning.

4. Ownership over the means of production is collective (except in the case of micro-enterprises).

5. It is based on the equal distribution of surplus.

6. It is solidaristic with the environment in which it develops.

7. It holds on to its own autonomy in the face of monopolistic centers of economic or political power.


XII. Extending Solidarity Economics -


I. Global Issues:

a. Deglobalization: radically reducing the powers and roles of the TNC-driven WTO and Bretton Woods institutions. The formation of new institutions helping to devolve the greater part of production, trade and economic decision-making to national and local levels (Walden Bello).
b. Sharing the Solidarity Economics Alternative to War and Global Collapse with all nations and people.
c. Abolish corporations outright or through the steps outlined by the International Forum on Globalization. (Utne Reader, May-June 2003, p. 55)
d. The WTO, FTAA, NAFTA, IMF and World Banks cease to exist. -
e. Research biodiversity and threats to the Amazon Basin region and other key biodiversity zones. -
f. GMOs are forbidden along with most toxic chemicals (at local, regional and global levels). The US pays reparations for the damages done by these bio-terror weapons. -


II. Polices for Transitional Periods, Austerity or Future Improvements -

Severe penalties for bribery or fraud related to the following policies:
a. Phase-out private land ownership beyond subsistence needs and reduce the area required for subsistence with improved knowledge and techniques.
b. Restrict water use for non-essential uses. -
c. Identify economic bottlenecks, excess profits, pollution sources, corruption and beneficial economic activities (import substitution potential).
d. Watershed planning for ecological development with land reform (condemnation) to protect and to wisely share available resources.
e. Research and experimentation on small development projects: State and regional micro credit for sustainability; Mini canteens locally or coop-owned to travel remote areas and sell things cheap (trade/barter) with some subsidies for important, health, education and sustainable farming items; Donations of Cattle, pig or chicken herds with the condition that in the second year the community turnover a part of the herd to neighboring communities (or farmers chosen by ballot or lot) A condition being that the operations are run collectively or as a cooperative.
f. Farming bottlenecks are common in transport, marketing, sales, value adding, packaging and promotion, so locally owned and operated cooperatives should be subsidized to provide abundant employment in these enterprises. -
g. More equitable and democratic processes for economic planning that incorporate participatory budgeting, popular assemblies, planning from below and new mixtures of all of these. -
h. Develop weighted criteria for participatory budgeting and new social accounting practices. -
i. Enforced environmental regulation of all uses of petroleum products and other chemicals. Large taxes on all toxic products to pay for their regulation and disposal. -
j. Improve the usefulness and facilitation skills of the rotating panels of scientists, planners and citizens (some from other regions) who review and investigate communities to see how their development plans operate, were arrived at, and how well they meet the Regional guidelines (plans).
k. Mechanisms for appeal and precaution, avenues for citizen feedback. -
l. Rural repatriation programs. -


III. TRANSPORTATION ISSUES (52)

a. Phase out private car use; Provide small shopping markets and housing near to people's jobs. -
b. Put the Localization Alternative first; more local production, import substitution and support to infant industries and cooperatives. -
c. Urban Transport Polices: no car zones and increased fees for vehicle registration. -
d. Taxes on gasoline and diesel fuel (60-90% of price)
e. Free buses and trains; a clean moped exchange program.. -
f. Bicycle manufacture, repair and price subsidies. -
g. Lower speed limits to save energy, lives and the costs of high-speed roads. -


CONCLUSION PART II

Solidarity Economics answers these questions convincingly: How much land and wealth redistribution; How to create new structures to restrain the State, guarantee local autonomy and individual freedoms; and What is the role of economic growth.(55) How much democratic choice is desired or possible is something that people will have to configure once they have explored Solidarity Economics in their everyday lives and conflicts. The final question -- and one that is difficult to predict -- is the one of agency: who will fight, who will lose?(56)What do the working people want from Lula and the PT government in Brazil? The landless peasants want land where they can live and produce. The workers, victims of restructuring plans (IMF), want employment with all their rights. Everyone wants to improve social security keep it public and based on workers' solidarity. The homeless want homes. The youth want a future, education and real jobs.(57)


Solidarity Economics is the platform for the Carnival, for everyone who wants a solidaristic life. In this sense it is also a potentially unifying force for the global anti-capitalist resistance movement to throw at the elite and the capitalist bankers. With an understanding of Solidarity all of the factions of the movement for change can find something for themselves and reasons to struggle together with everyone else. The small and medium farmers and the landless workers can fly under the Solidarity banner for it offers them land in a thriving rural community with credit, marketing and technical assistance to reduce the dangers of chemicals, GMOs and bankruptcy from foreign competition. The poor urban dwellers will have more food, health care, education, opportunity and the choice to return to a rural renaissance or at least to not see their barrios further overcrowded with rising crime. To the middle classes Solidarity offers peace of mind and a society working together that they can be proud of. In the medium term, there will be a niche economy for some of their skills as import substitution is established. The transition may not be easy for the middle classes, but it is hoped that their lowered (money) standard of living (poverty will be reduced but there eventually won't be much of a middle class) will be compensated for by increased stability and normalcy - something that the middle classes all over the world will never have again under neoliberalism.


Women stand to gain the most from localization policies and a solidaristic society because women and children make up most of the poor and they have been the most neglected in the areas of health care, education and respect. Children will benefit from all aspects of Solidarity Economics, from a cleaner environment, and a real (revolutionary) education where their skills are needed for practical applications that increase the sustainability of solidarity and the new society. This usefulness will contribute to their personal growth as they contribute to important projects in their communities - communities that will be full of cultural activities, music and the excitement of hope. For workers a solidaristic society means a great victory over capitalism and greed. Workers cooperatives will manage and operate most factories and businesses. With import substitution and wealth redistribution, the local and regional demand for products will remain high. For teachers and universities solidarity is a new page - as new discipline - one that renews their purpose and their value to local communities and the whole of society. Technicians, teachers, doctors and engineers will all be in great demand and many students will rise up quickly to fill positions of responsibility.

Che Guevara, Jesus, Buddha and Mohammed preached a communitarian and caring socio-economics. This impulse can never be defeated - it is inherent in our human roots of tribe and family priorities. The impulse can be found throughout history: from St. Francis to the Catholic Worker and Liberation Theology; from the Diggers, Levelers and millions of protesters in the streets of London against the Bush-Blair war; in Gandhi's well-described village economic program of Swadeshi; in the Warsaw ghetto uprisings and the Israeli Kibbutzim (before 1980); in the 60's back-to-the-land movement and the squats of Europe; and in the communal and eco-city proposals of the early German Greens and the US Green Program. It lives on in the barrios of Caracas; the colonias of Bogota and Medellin; the highlands of Peru and Bolivia; the occupied factories of Buenos Aires and its lives strong in the camps and settlements of the MST landless workers in Brazil.

The spirit to live simply, in cooperation, mutual aid, solidarity and for the benefit of your community refuses all attempts at subjugation from the totalitarian right of the US-Euro Empire or the abuses of the left. From our research and workshops in Latin America we have found widespread support for Solidarity Economics. A few libertarians had criticisms, a few anarchists didn't like us supporting even a local people-centered and controlled democratic government, and a few socialists objected to our preference for low levels of technology. Little of this Solidarity Economic proposal is original. Having derived it from the works of numerous groups we believe that all of the following people will (eventually - at least if the public demands) enthusiastically support it: Walden Bello (Focus on the Global South); Vandana Shiva - India ( www.IFG.org ); Collin Hines - UK; Peter Rosset and Media Benjamin - US ( Food First - IATPE); Fidel Castro - Cuba; Daniel Ortega (Nicaraguan Sandinistas); Hugo Chavez (MVR-Venezuela); MST- Brazil; Lula- PT - Brazil; Evo Morales (MAS-Bolivia); EZLN-Chiapas; FARC_EP/ELN-Colombia; Via Campesina; student radicals and everyone working for the poor, for peace and for a healthier environment.


Some people are afraid of the words (and the world) that we have set forth here. They feel strongly that each region must find its own way and craft their own designs. True, true. But we all wear shoes. All shoes are not the same, but they are still shoes even if they are homemade sandals or thick calluses. Just as no one is against protection for your feet, no one should fear or reject ideas and the discussions of protections (structures) for our human future, our communities and our struggle for a better world. We have seen living examples of how a new world will function and also examples of what it takes to struggle for what you believe in. Let us call this new way Solidarity Economics - the Carnival of Our Needs - and let us use it as a pot-banging call to action against all Empires and their neo-colonial vassals.


Marx once said that ideas become a material force when they grip the minds of the masses. Walden Bello says that truth becomes fact when the masses demand it. We believe the world is big and that we are small... the world's temperature will soon rise beyond where it has been in 400 million years; in 2000 US citizens produced 15% more carbon dioxide than in 1990... At some level these are the only facts worth knowing about the Earth.

-- Bill McKibben (Granta, November 2003)



GLOSSARY OF KEY SOLIDARITY ECONOMICS TERMS:

Definitions for an Economy of Solidarity

1. Regional means a political or bioregional area within a nation. Community means a region within a region.

2. Social equity means a gradual and reasonable equal distribution of income, land and resources including education, health care and respect.(20)

3. Self-reliance means that a community has a goal to produce most of its basic goods, capital and services from within its boundaries. And that it's not dependent for these items from trade. To protect the environment and maintain good neighbor relations, a community should trade when necessary with its nearest neighbors first. This applies to nations and regions too.(21)

4. Externalities can be positive or negative and are also called external costs and benefits. When some people bear costs that they are not compensated for, these costs are said to be external costs. An example is water pollution that travels downstream or underground and then future users have to pay (filter or treat) to make the water clean again. Other examples are garbage, toxics, global warming, the noise from airplanes, nuclear power (and most complex technologies) and the spread of GMOs across property lines or national borders. One pays for gasoline but not directly for the costs of pollution (bad air, respiratory problems for others, dead birds), disposal of abandoned junk cars or oil wars in the Middle East. Negative externalities must be regulated or taxed to reduce their occurrence as the market does not take care of them. Positive externalities are things like the benefits of less disease for everyone and fewer sick workers for businesses from universal healthcare; smarter workers and better voters from universal education; the benefits to most people from less urbanization and more employment opportunities from thriving rural communities (localization); less crime and less government spending on prisons and police from programs that increase social equity; and the many benefits to all from government provision and protection of many public and quasi-public goods. Positive externalities should be subsidized to increase their availability and usefulness.(22)

5. Public and Quasi-Public Goods are things like air, parks, beaches, information, libraries, roadways, national defense, a clean environment, a lighthouse, radio broadcasts, the airwaves or a fireworks display where it's hard to stop non-payers from consuming. And the use by one person does not limit the use by others. Businesses do not provide enough of these goods and so it is best for government to provide them as their benefits accrue to all and to the future. Instead of profit, the mentality necessary for the provision of these goods is one of safety, fairness, access and sustainability.(23)

6. Capitalism is a system of market exchanges where government's role is only as a referee that regulates the excesses and prevents fraud. Taxes are used to pay for the expense of government. A legal framework and many laws and lawyers are necessary to fine tune legislation and argue contract provisions. Profits are maximized and this along with loans and stock sales is where capital comes from. The capitalists (business owners) invest this capital to seek greater returns (profits).(24) Today's capitalism has little resemblance to Adam Smith's original conception.

7. Socialism and Labor Managed Market Socialism (LMMS). In classic socialism the government owns the means of production (nationalized steel mills, power plants, mines). There are no capitalists and no profits, though many socialist experiments allow some markets to function (restaurants, food vendors, small farmers in remote areas). The Soviet Union is an example of socialism with limited markets where central planners in government ministries coordinated most production. Hungary (until 1986), Cuba and Nicaragua (1980-1989) are examples of market socialism with limited government planning. Yugoslavia is the only example of LMMS. In this system the government owns the factories and farms, but the workers make all of the decisions and operate within a market system of competition. Many economists consider LMMS to be a system as efficient as capitalism if soft-budget problems can be overcome. In the Solidarity Economic model soft budget constraints are not an issue as firms are small, small-holder private property (with social property restrictions) is allowed and rather than a distant or central government owning the means of production, most of the land and factories are owned (controlled) by the locality or the region through popular assemblies, cooperatives and public ownership.(25)

8. Basic Needs Goods: pure food and water; health for all people and the Environment; programs for women and children; housing; sanitation; defense; dignity for indigenous people and all workers; education for a Solidarity Economy and programs of social equity; transport for the processing and distribution of basic needs goods; inputs required for the production of basic needs goods.

9. Trade and Problems With Trade: Who, What, Where, How? And Why to Ask Why. Trade (travel) is always bad from a localization viewpoint. Trade indicates a shortage of something you would pay more for than a local substitute. Trade means that some other person, town or country produces something that you can't or won't; something better or more cleverly (cheap) made. Trade is always bad because it creates pollution, waste, complexity (like war) and hidden or long-term costs. The waste results when resources (labor, land, capital, sustainability) are diverted to the trade (transport) sector. This includes ports, harbors, airports, trains, highways, trucks, cars, boats, ships, planes, jets, warehouses, bridges, horses, customs bureaucracy and even bicycles. Trade hides pollution in oceans or in other countries. It also introduces non-native pests and diseases which in many areas are responsible for endangering more species than habitat destruction.(26)

10. Import Substitution Economics (ISE). This economic development strategy is aimed at reducing economic dependency through government support to infant industries. Tariffs and quotas are used to limit the imports of certain goods and subsidies are used to establish domestic industries to supply these imports. Most countries have used this strategy in their early stages of development (industrialization). ISE can be carried out in a variety of ways, from tax incentives for local entrepreneurs to paying foreign companies to relocate. Often ISE is used to increase a nation's exports in order to pay for the program. Imports are considered leakage from a country - money that is flowing out. When locally produced products replace imports there is a multiplier effect: an auto manufacturer is established that buys inputs from local suppliers and both companies are now paying wages to employees who previously were not employed in this business because the products or inputs were imported. Less imports allows a country to export less because it no longer needs to earn foreign currency for the now replaced imports.(27) The momentum of the World Social Forum process depends upon our collective ability to produce acute analyses, as well as concrete alternatives and action proposals during the meetings. www.fse-esf.org.



Improved Footnotes Soon!




Posted by mer130 at 2:34 PM EST
Updated: Thursday, 27 January 2005 12:06 AM EST
Thursday, 13 January 2005
January MER FLYER (Comment!!!)
STOP Free Trade Deals -
Phony Drug Wars and US Toxic Spray Programs - Outlaw Genetic Pollution GMOs - and Corporate Farming - Dissolve the Corrupt Upper Classes and Stand United Against Killer-Capitalism's US Imperialist Intrigues!

News Update:

DrugWar:drug warWWW.Anncol.org

Struggles: WWW.Bolivia.indymedia.org

Bolivar Revolution:WWW.Venezuelaanalysis.com

Aid Projects:
Aid ProjectWWW.AndesCircle.faces.com


... MUNDO Lleno de Escuelas Revolucionarias

CONTACT: MEscuelas_Revolt@yahoo.com




ARE YOU A TEACHER? ?


A STUDENT???

The Struggle Requires IDEAS...

as much as

Bodies or Arms.



The path of a Sustainable Future is shinning clear: Start Building the Schools and Teachers to Lead and to Defend This Intercontinental Struggle Against Killer-Capitalism =>>>>>>


With ... Community Councils, Land Reform, Cooperatives, New Priorities ...



MUNDDO de ESCUELAS REVOLUCIONARIAS
(MER) Teaches:

New Economics - Resource Planning - Social Solidarity

Agrarian Reform | Participatory Decentralized Economics | Solidaristic Policies

Education & Radical Restructuring for a Solidarity Society



VOLUNTEERS :::


For the Revolution: There are projects for every skill level that desperately need your aid in Venezuela and Bolivia. Community Radio, English Tutoring/Translating, Construction/Architecture, Computer Operations, Engineers, Musicians/Performers AND researchers to assist economic analysis and marketing for indigenous and poor people crafts and farming sales.


LINKS :


WWW.MER130.tripod.com/

Phtos and More Andeshttp://www.angelfire.com/amiga2/andes


Photos/Graphics:

photos and graghicswww.CirculoAndino.Zoto.com



Posted by mer130 at 2:30 PM EST
Updated: Wednesday, 19 January 2005 1:00 PM EST
Wednesday, 12 January 2005
Table of Contents - Master Blog
Topic: Master Blog



I.) ECONOMICS OF MER:

A.)) Caras Vuelvan - Solidarity Economics



English

Spanish


B.)) Criteria for Decision Making


C.)) Promotional FLyer - Media Promo

The MER Promo Art FLyer http://mer130.tripod.com/index.blog?entry_id=592684

Criteria for Economics and Technology http://mer130.tripod.com/index.blog?entry_id=600043


II.) New Economic Program of Mundos Escuelas Revolucionarias (MER)



English


New Economic Program MER http://mer130.tripod.com/index.blog?entry_id=600035


Spanish







III.) Andes Circle - Fondos de Solidaridad Andino


ANDES AID PROJECTS www.andescircle.faces.com


THINGS THAT YOU CAN DO FOR THE ANDES!

http://THINGS THE ANDES NEEDS andescircle.faces.com/Blogs/207773.aspx






IV.) FSA - BOLIVIA

http://andescircle.faces.com/Blogs/193554.aspx



V.) FSA - PERU




VI.) Photo Album #1


www.circuloandino.zoto.com



VII.) Photo Album #2


Photos & Venezuela Infowww.zorpia.com/andescircle







RESOURCES AND LINKS :

To See the main Appeal of FSA - Andes Circle - Funding Solidarity in the Andes


1. FSA - Fundos de Solidaridad Andino; Appeal and Who We Are:
http://andescircle.faces.com/Blogs/193554.aspx


2. Cuba - Venezueal Treaties and James Petras on the legitimacy of the Colombian guerrilla FARC - EP and their struggle

http://andescircle.faces.com/Blogs/193554.aspx

Or for the full article see:
4.) Cuba and Venezuela slam US Free Trade Area of the Americas


Dec 15, VHeadline.com; Reporters Russian PRAVDA:


2.) Participatory Democracy in Venezuela, part 3
Problems and Opportunities for Citizen Power in Venezuela
http://andescircle.faces.com/Blogs/193554.aspx

3. Struggles in the Venezuealn Central Bank see comment for above:
Comments to andescircle


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

andescircle Tuesday, Dec 28 2004, 05:17:08 PM

http://vheadline.com/readnews.asp?id=23963

Cuba and Venezuela slam US Free Trade Area of the Americas PRAVDA correspondent Hernan Etchaleco writes: Both nations proposed a more equal alternative based in mutual cooperation rather than in pure pro-market policies. Venezuela promised financing for Cuban industrial and infrastructure projects, while Cuba agreed to pay a minimum price of US$27 per barrel of Venezuelan oil, as part of the accord "to apply the Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA) ."


5.) Central Bank of Venezuela (BCV) capitulates to President's $1 billion demand to help Venezuela's poor.
http://vheadline.com/readnews.asp?id=23976

6. Miscellaneous Venezuela Info:
http://zorpia.com/cgi/member.cgi?username=andescircle&type=journal
http://vheadline.com/readnews.asp?id=23963

7. January Version of Mundos de Escuelas Revolucionarias ( MER ) economics program:
http://andescircle.faces.com/Blogs/193554.aspx

8. See comment of above for Misc. Notes on MER program.

9. Things to Do to help Andes Circle and the ANDES:
http://andescircle.faces.com/Blogs/207773.aspx

10. The Venezuelan Model of Development: The Path of Solidarity
http://www.venezuelanalysis.com/articles.php?artno=1189

Jun 02, 2004 By: Felipe P?rez Mart? - "Vuelvan Caras" Mission


11. Photos of Farming in the Andes
http://andescircle.faces.com/Images/70157.aspx


12. Venezuela's Human Development Index: A Lesson in the Malleability of Statistics
http://www.venezuelanalysis.com/articles.php?artno=1220

Jul 19, 2004 By: Jonah Gindin - Venezuelanalysis.com


13. The Greening of Venezuela - Agrarian Cooperatives, by David Raby
Greeniong of Venezuelahttp://www.venezuelanalysis.com/articles.php?artno=1226

In the past fifteen months the government has begun to redistribute uncultivated land from private.
estates or public lands to poor peasants and landless labourers.


14. Chavez calls for Anti-Globalization Office:

Chaveaz Calls for Anti-Globalization Officehttp://www.venezuelanalysis.com/news.php?newsno=1437


15. Issues in Mountain Regions (Panos)

Issues in Mountain Regions (Panos) http://mer130.tripod.com/index.blog?entry_id=600049


16. F.O.S. -- Belgium Development Group With Good Program and Perspectives (Works in Bolivia)

http://FOS Development Org - NGOandescircle.faces.com/Blogs.aspx



Posted by mer130 at 1:10 PM EST
Updated: Thursday, 27 January 2005 12:11 AM EST

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